Climate Science

06/03/14
Author: 
Roger Pielke Jr.

Last Friday, the White House posted on its website a six-page criticism of me by the president’s science advisor, John Holdren, expanding on testimony he had given to Congress last week claiming that my views on climate change and extreme weather are outside of "mainstream scientific opinion.” Holdren was specifically responding to Se

Category: 
25/02/14
Author: 
John Vidal

Large-scale human engineering of the Earth's climate to prevent catastrophic global warming would not only be ineffective but would have severe unintended side effects and could not be safely stopped, a comparison of five proposed methods has concluded.

Category: 
21/02/14
Author: 
Dana Nuccitelli
A German police officers shows a Nazi flag confiscated from the far-right group Besseres Hannover. Contrarian climate scientist and conservative media favorite Roy Spencer posted a rant on his blog against those he calls "global warming Nazis." Photograph: Alexander Koerner/AP

Because the pool of climate experts who dispute that humans are the primary cause of global warming is so small, representing just 2 to 4 percent of climate scientists, climate contrarians often reference the same few contrarian scientists.

24/02/14
Author: 
Staff
A dark and mostly ice-free Arctic Ocean beneath a   tempestuous swirl of clouds on September 1, 2012,   a time when sea ice coverage had declined to an   area roughly equal to the land mass of Greenland.   Image source: Lance-Modis/NASA AQUA.

What’s the difference between a majestic layer of white sea ice and an ominous dark blue open ocean? For the Arctic, it means about a 30 to 50 per cent loss in reflectivity (or albedo). And when seasonal sea-ice states are between 30 and 80 per cent below 1979 measures (depending on the method used to gauge remaining sea ice and relative time of year), that means very, very concerning additional heating impacts to an already dangerous human-caused warming. How concerning, however, remained somewhat unclear until recently.

Category: 
10/02/14
Author: 
Claudia Dreifus

When Elizabeth Kolbert joined The New Yorker in 1999, after more than a decade covering New York politics as a reporter and columnist for The New York Times, she began gravitating to environmental issues. “The magazine has a history in this area,” she told me in one of two recent conversations. “They’d published Rachel Carson. It was unoccupied territory at the time.” This week Ms.

08/02/14
Author: 
Pete McMartin

"Severe Drought Has U.S. West Fearing Worst" - front page headline, New York Times, Sunday, Feb. 1 Ayoung couple on the Canada Line asks for directions to the airport. They are flying home to San Francisco after a week skiing in Whistler, despite the fact there was not much snow. "But there was more snow in Whistler," the man says, "because there's none in Tahoe."

18/02/14
Author: 
By Laura Poppick

Melting Arctic sea ice has contributed considerably more to warming at the top of the world than previously predicted by climate models, according to a new analysis of 30 years of satellite observations…

13/02/14
Author: 
Ari Phillips

On Wednesday, the Church of England’s parliamentary body announced that it was considering redirecting its investments in an effort to battle climate change. The motion put forward, which called for the Church to recognize “the damage being done to the planet through the burning of fossil fuels,” received overwhelming support.

17/02/14
Author: 
Ivan Semeniuk

Scientists call it Santa’s revenge. It’s the theory that persistent weather patterns at the mid-latitudes – like this winter’s tediously long-lasting polar vortex or California’s severe drought – are a direct consequence of climate change heating up the Arctic. New evidence suggests the link is real, even as experts continue to argue over how much it is influencing the weather on a day to day basis. The effect has implications for severe weather predictions, food security and water use across the northern hemisphere.

Category: 
13/02/14
Author: 
Bruce Cheadle

OTTAWA - Finance Minister Jim Flaherty's latest federal budget dedicates all of five pages to "conserving Canada's natural heritage" — with measures such as resurfacing the Trans-Canada Highway through a national park and building more snowmobile trails. Critics cite the absence of the words "climate change" in the 400-plus page document as evidence that the government has "just given up on the environment."

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