Alberta

18/04/16
Author: 
James Laxer; David Climenhaga

Why Leap isn’t a manifesto for the people

By James Laxer

11/04/16
Author: 
Ross Belot

“I won’t let up,” Alberta Premier Rachel Notley told delegates to the NDP’s national convention last week. “We must get to ‘yes’ on a pipeline.” She repeated that message Saturday, asking the convention to support “pipelines to tidewater that allow us to diversify our markets.”

In doing so, Premier Notley just became the latest Canadian politician to play games with pipelines. She’s telling Albertans a pipeline to tidewater can cure what ails the industry. It won’t — it can’t — because the problem a pipeline to tidewater was intended to address doesn’t exist anymore.

10/04/16
Author: 
Hannah McKinnon

The idea that greater pipeline capacity and access to tidewater would maximize the value Alberta receives for its tar sands crude is a standard talking point for industry, politicians, and other commentators in the ongoing oil price-induced recession in Alberta.

This briefing note counters this argument with analysis that shows that even if Alberta had expanded access to tidewater today, in the form of pipelines to east or west coasts, it would not be any better off.

10/04/16
Author: 
Mike Hudema

Dear Premier Notley,

I support your government on a lot of things.

I was there the day it was sworn in, when thousands of people filled the legislative grounds. I was there when the first cabinet with full gender parity in Alberta’s history was sworn in. I cheered when - after years of an unfair tax system creating unequal burdens – the government raised corporate taxes. I cheered again when your government helped get the money out of politics.

09/04/16

October 14, 2015 - 2:19pm

Gordon Laxer has just written a new book titled After the Sands: Energy and Ecological Security for Canadians. In it, the founding director of the Parkland Institute and long-time Council of Canadians Board member, argues for the need to plan beyond the tar sands, which he refers to as the Sands.

08/04/16
Author: 
CLAUDIA CATTANEO

CALGARY — Alberta Premier Rachel Notley, once a reluctant defender of the oilpatch, now says she won’t take no for an answer on getting a bitumen pipeline to tidewater.

The NDP premier made the pledge in a televised speech to Albertans on Thursday evening, a week before presenting a budget that will come with a $10-billion-plus deficit and help for the needy as the once oil-rich province struggles with a price shock that has destroyed government revenue, investment and jobs.

04/04/16
Author: 
Kai Nagata

Beijing has high hopes for the new Trudeau government.

On October 20th, 2015, Prime Minister-elect Justin Trudeau received a congratulatory call from China’s ambassador Luo Zhaohui. The next day, the state-run China Daily newspaper celebrated “improved prospects for a Free Trade Agreement with China” under Canada’s new Liberal government. A week later Premier Li Keqiang himself picked up the phone.

31/03/16
Author: 
Daniel León Rodríguez
The solar industry says Alberta can generate $5 billion in investments and 70,000 jobs. Image from Go Solar.

Joel Nodelman said it wasn't easy finding information about solar energy in the 1990s.

Nodelman, an environmental engineer, said he had been assigned to develop a solar energy pilot project for an Edmonton utility company where he worked.

He started by looking in the Yellow Pages.

“We knew nothing about solar installations at the time,” said Nodelman, today a climate change consultant.

28/03/16
Author: 
JEFF LEWIS

 [Webpage editor's comment: Another sign of the unravelling of the tar sands economy]

Inter Pipeline Ltd., whose customers include big oil sands players, has threatened to slap liens on crude oil it transports and is seeking letters of credit from shippers with ratings that have been chopped below investment grade. 

14/03/16
Author: 
JEFF RUBIN
Oil at the first phase of separation from the sand is seen at the Suncor tar sands processing plant near Fort McMurray, Alberta, in this Sept. 17, 2014 file photo.
(Todd Korol/Reuters)

Oil sands producers may have collectively breathed a sigh of relief on Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s recent failure to get the premiers signing on to a national price for carbon emissions. However, domestic measures to reduce carbon emissions are the least of oil sands producers’ concerns when it comes to how actions to mitigate climate change will challenge their industry’s survival.

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