Energy

04/02/23
Author: 
Phil Gasper
A Planet to Win

Website editor: An interesting interview

Winter 2023 (New Politics Vol. XIX No. 2, Whole Number 74)

An Interview with Alyssa Battistoni

Alyssa Battistoni teaches political theory at Barnard College. She is the co-author of A Planet to Win: Why We Need a Green New Deal (Verso 2019) and is currently writing a book titled Free Gifts: Capitalism and the Politics of Nature. Phil Gasper spoke with Alyssa on behalf of the New Politics editorial board on November 4, 2022.

04/02/23
Author: 
Phil McKenna
Electricity pylon and power cables. Credit: Tim Graham/Getty Images

Jan. 31, 2023

Electric utilities are likely responsible for the nation’s higher than expected emissions of sulfur hexafluoride, a greenhouse gas 25,000 times worse for the climate than carbon dioxide.

While emissions of sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), the world’s most potent greenhouse gas, have fallen sharply in the U.S. in recent decades, actual emissions are significantly higher than the official government estimates, a new study concludes.

30/01/23
Author: 
Daniel Yergin
Refinery - Katja Buchholz/Getty Images

Jan. 23, 2023

Given the scale and complexity of the transition away from hydrocarbons, some worry that economic analysis has been given short shrift in the policy planning process. A clear-eyed assessment of the transition's prospects requires a deeper understanding of at least four major challenges.

29/01/23
Author: 
Amanda Follett Hosgood
Iris Energy’s Prince George bitcoin mining operation, which opened in September, sits on 12 acres of land near the Fraser River. The facility employs about 15 people and draws 50 megawatts of electricity. Photo provided by Iris Energy.

Jan. 19, 2023

Cryptocurrency operations have been taking up residence in forestry towns. Amidst a turbulent market, the province is hitting pause.

When most people think about bitcoin, they likely think of a shiny new tech industry that operates somewhere in “the cloud.”

28/01/23
Author: 
D'Arcy Briggs
Free public transit: A path to climate justice - illustration

Jan. 24, 2023

We are in the midst of both an environmental crisis and an affordability crisis, which are linked. The solutions on offer, from raising fares to relying on electric cars, don’t solve either problem. But increasing access to public transit is good for all workers, all riders, and the planet. Taking action for free and accessible public transit can win reforms and set us on track for climate justice.

14/01/23
Author: 
CBC The Current
Bill McKibben

Website editor: Ecosocialists will find this interview lacking on such questions as consumption, profit and inequality and yet: "Is your faith in governments or in individuals to force that change? Neither, my faith is in movements.  I think the most important thing individuals can do is be a little bit less of an individual and join together in movements with others large enough to make change happen"

 

 

 Jan. 13, 2023

06/01/23
Author: 
Cloe Logan
Illustration by Ata Ojani - What’s an SMR?

"Are SMRs viable? That is the biggest question surrounding SMRs. Although the plans for these next-generation nuclear units might hypothetically work, their viability hasn’t been proven anywhere. 

Jan. 4, 2023

Canada has big climate goals and we need ambitious solutions to meet them. The federal government is banking on a new generation of nuclear technology to help us clean up power grids and reduce planet-warming greenhouse gas emissions. But will it work?

15/12/22
Author: 
Jonathan Neale
Fight the Fire - Book Cover

Nov. 28, 2022

Ecosocialism in the age of climate change needs to stop being a niche, an abstract ideological program, and turn into a concrete, practical, non-dogmatic plan for the future.

We need to make some serious changes in the ecosocialist project.

It’s good that we have the idea of ecosocialism. Because the words stand for a basic idea that ecology and socialism go together. Linked, they are the hope of the world.

01/12/22
Author: 
Andrew Nikiforuk
Tuesday’s 5.8 tremor occurred in an area where wastewater is injected underground, building pressure over time.

Dec. 1, 2022

Tuesday’s 5.8 tremor occurred in an area where wastewater is injected underground, building pressure over time.

A cluster of tremors, including the largest recorded earthquake in Alberta’s history, may have been due to oil and gas activity in the region.

On Tuesday evening Earthquakes Canada recorded a tremor registering a magnitude of 5.8 on the Richter scale that shook up a large portion of northwestern Alberta and B.C.

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