Tar Sands

18/04/16
Author: 
Paul Weinberg

April 13, 2016 - When Rachel Notley's NDP came to power last spring in Alberta, Gordon Laxer's book, After the Sands: Energy and Ecological Security for Canadians, on ecological renewal and Canadian petro-politics was already at the publisher. And so, he was given a week to do some major rewriting because he had not foreseen this political earthquake in the making.

15/04/16

[Webpage editor's introduction: Below are three articles about the Leap Manifesto and the NDP, first from the Jacobin.]


 

The impossible Dream

By Todd Gordon, Jacobin, April 15, 2016 

15/04/16
Author: 
Gary Engler

What is it with union and political ‘leaders’ who treat their members as if they were children not old enough to deal with reality?

15/04/16

[Four articles on the reaction to the Leap Manifesto, first from Rabble]

 

Rather than fearing the Leap Manifesto, let's bring on the debate

 

By Linda McQuaig, Rabble, April 15, 2016

 

That silly Leap Manifesto -- giving itself away right in the subtitle, which calls for "a Canada based on caring for the Earth and one another." No wonder it provoked fury and outrage.

14/04/16
Author: 
Christina Pellegrini and Jeff Lewis

Canada's big banks are cutting credit lines of struggling energy companies, heaping more financial strain on an industry battered by the collapse in oil prices.

Bank of Nova Scotia, Royal Bank of Canada and National Bank of Canada are among those reducing credit lines as the lenders complete their semi-annual review of borrowing limits in the hard-hit energy sector.

 

13/04/16
Author: 
Thomas Walkom

It may scare some New Democrats, but this sketchy recipe for fighting climate change is not particularly left-wing.

The short document, available on-line, can arouse fierce passions.

Alberta NDP Premier Rachel Notley has called its centrepiece recommendations naive and ill-informed.

Writing in the Star, former party official Robin Sears has dismissed it as the product of “loony leapers.”

11/04/16
Author: 
Ross Belot

“I won’t let up,” Alberta Premier Rachel Notley told delegates to the NDP’s national convention last week. “We must get to ‘yes’ on a pipeline.” She repeated that message Saturday, asking the convention to support “pipelines to tidewater that allow us to diversify our markets.”

In doing so, Premier Notley just became the latest Canadian politician to play games with pipelines. She’s telling Albertans a pipeline to tidewater can cure what ails the industry. It won’t — it can’t — because the problem a pipeline to tidewater was intended to address doesn’t exist anymore.

11/04/16
Author: 
Tom Randall

[Webpage: Note that this artticle refers to new investment.]

 

Wind and solar have grown seemingly unstoppable.

While two years of crashing prices for oil, natural gas, and coal triggered dramatic downsizing in those industries, renewables have been thriving. Clean energy investment broke new records in 2015 and is now seeing twice as much global funding as fossil fuels.

10/04/16
Author: 
Hannah McKinnon

The idea that greater pipeline capacity and access to tidewater would maximize the value Alberta receives for its tar sands crude is a standard talking point for industry, politicians, and other commentators in the ongoing oil price-induced recession in Alberta.

This briefing note counters this argument with analysis that shows that even if Alberta had expanded access to tidewater today, in the form of pipelines to east or west coasts, it would not be any better off.

10/04/16
Author: 
Mike Hudema

Dear Premier Notley,

I support your government on a lot of things.

I was there the day it was sworn in, when thousands of people filled the legislative grounds. I was there when the first cabinet with full gender parity in Alberta’s history was sworn in. I cheered when - after years of an unfair tax system creating unequal burdens – the government raised corporate taxes. I cheered again when your government helped get the money out of politics.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Tar Sands