LNG - Fracking

15/10/15
Author: 
Nelson Bennett
Rendering of the proposed Woodfibre LNG project | Submitted

The Squamish First Nation has given the green light to the $1.7 billion Woodfibre LNG project in the form of a Squamish environmental certificate.

Squamish council has issued an environmental certificate to Woodfibre LNG, but has yet to give one to FortisBC, which would build the pipeline infrastructure needed to supply the plant with gas.  

However, both FortisBC and Woodfibre have agreed to all 25 conditions that the Squamish have set out for approving the project.

14/10/15
Author: 
Derrick Penner
Richard Wright, a spokesman for Luutkudziiwus, a 600-member house group of the Gitxsan Nation in action in Vancouver, BC., October 13, 2015. The group will file a legal challenge against the proposed Prince Rupert Gas Transmission pipeline which they say will decimate wild salmon in the Skeena as it crosses 34 km of its traditional Madii Lii territory. Photograph by: Nick Procaylo , PNG   Read more: http://www.vancouversun.com/prince+rupert+pacific+project+faces+challenge/11436865/story.html#ixzz3oYWkz2j4

The province faces a new First Nations legal challenge to an element of the Pacific Northwest Liquefied Natural Gas project just as it prepares to open its major annual conference aimed at promoting the prospects of its still nascent industry.

03/10/15
Author: 
Brent Jang

[Website editor's note: Two articles, published Sept 30 and Oct 1, 2015,  on the proposed Energy East tar sands pipeline and the proposed gas pipeline and LNG plant in BC] 

Native leaders divided on oil-sands pipelines 

Two groups of First Nations have issued duelling statements on where aboriginal people stand on oil-sands pipelines, highlighting opposing native viewpoints toward the energy industry.

19/09/15
Author: 
Derrick Penner

[Webpage editor's note: This article is part of a series on water supply and use in British Columbia published in the Vancouver Sun daily. This article addresses the water use and abuse by the natural gas fracking industry in the northeast of the province, incluidng the huge expansion of water abuse if plans by the industry to create liquefied natural gas production (LNG) on coastal BC are successful.]

19/09/15
Author: 
Brent Jang
Lelu Island, site of an LNG export terminal proposed by Pacific NorthWest LNG. The group has offered $1-billion to the Lax Kw’alaams in exchange for their consent. (Brent Jang/The Globe and Mail)

The Lax Kw’alaams First Nation is seeking aboriginal title to Lelu Island and Flora Bank, creating a legal obstacle for a Malaysian-led consortium that wants to build an $11.4-billion terminal to export liquefied natural gas from British Columbia.

The aboriginal group will file a notice of civil claim to launch the legal action next week in the B.C. Supreme Court, Lax Kw’alaams Mayor Garry Reece said in an interview on Friday.

14/09/15
Author: 
April Lawrence

About 50 members of the Tsartlip First Nation joined in the protest as representatives of Steelhead LNG arrived at the band office Friday for the meeting.

The Tsartlip do not currently support the project, saying they were not consulted before the deal was announced last month.

Chief Don Tom says when industry approaches communities that live in poverty it makes those communities vulnerable.

14/09/15
Author: 
Justine Hunter

Fracking is a critical component of the B.C. Liberal government’s aspiration to develop a liquefied natural gas industry, and the public has been assured the practice is safe and well regulated.

A recent B.C. Environmental Appeal Board judgment, however, chronicles a provincial decision-making process around a fracking operation that was informed by untried, slapdash science.

It is not the picture painted by Premier Christy Clark and her government. “We have the best record of fracking in the world,” she told The Globe and Mail in October, 2013. “We’re good at it.”

14/09/15
Author: 
Gordon Hoekstra

Northern B.C. First Nation members say they stopped Malaysian state-controlled Petronas, the company behind an $11.4-billion liquefied natural gas terminal, from starting test ocean drilling in northwest B.C. this weekend.

The 33-metre Quin Delta drill ship, owned by Gregg Marine in California, and a barge were moved into the waters off Lelu Island near Prince Rupert by Pacific NorthWest LNG early Saturday morning.

Some equipment was set up before First Nations went out to the ship and asked the workers to stop, said Joey Wesley, a Lax Kw’alaams First Nation member.

13/09/15
Author: 
Vaughn Palmer

VICTORIA — Cabinet minister Rich Coleman admitted to being caught off guard this week by news of potentially “catastrophic” lapses in safety at the Malaysian operations of Petronas, the company the B.C. Liberals are counting on to build the first liquefied natural gas terminal here in B.C.

“I had not had a chance to see it or read it,” Coleman told me Friday, referring to the 732-page audit that exposed concerns ranging from decades-long delays in inspections to corrosion that endangered the structural integrity of the company’s offshore oil and gas platforms.

09/09/15
Author: 
Chief Robert Chamberlin

Wednesday, September 9, 2015 1:12 PM

Press Release September 9, 2015

9 Allied Tribes of Lax'walams Support Hereditary Chiefs LeLu Island Camp To Stop Proposed LNG Plant.

Hereditary Chiefs & House Leaders of the Lax'walams First Nation have established a Camp on LeLu Island to stop further work on the proposed LNG Plant on the Flora Bank, a pristine fishing location.

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