Alberta

20/01/20
Author: 
Shane McNeil

Jan. 20, 2020

[See video at link.]

It’s too soon to call an end to Canada’s regulatory uncertainty around pipelines, despite recent advancements with Keystone XL and the Trans Mountain expansion project, according to a former TC Energy Corp. chief executive officer.

16/01/20
Author: 
John Paul Tasker ·

 Jan 16, 2020 

'Today it's heavy oil, tomorrow it could be anything else,' Justice Malcolm Rowe says at hearing

 [Watch video of Alberta Government here.]

06/01/20
Author: 
Laura Kane
FILE: Pipe for the Trans Mountain pipeline are unloaded in Edson, Alta. on June 18, 2019. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson

Jan 6, 2020

SUMMARY
The committee says the projects proceeded without free, prior and informed consent of impacted Indigenous groups
The right to "free, prior and informed consent" to resource projects is part of the UNDRIP

 

VANCOUVER — A United Nations committee working to end racism is urging Canada to immediately stop the construction of three major resource projects until it obtains approval from affected First Nations.

20/12/19
Author: 
Carl Meyer
Justice Minister and Attorney General David Lametti takes questions from reporters in West Block on Parliament Hill on Dec. 12, 2019. Photo by Kamara Morozuk

Dec. 18, 2019

Canada has denied that scientific reviews of oil-spill research were suppressed during Trans Mountain oil pipeline consultations, and accused Tsleil-Waututh Nation of being “misleading” and throwing out “baseless accusations."

Attorney General of Canada David Lametti has argued in a memorandum of fact and law submitted to the Federal Court of Appeal and obtained by National Observer that the reviews in question were "internal notes," not actual scientific peer reviews.

17/12/19
Author: 
Carl Meyer
In this photo dated Dec. 5, 2019, a worker in Alberta takes measurements for the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion. Trans Mountain Photo / Facebook

December 16th 2019

Canada “altered” scientific reviews of oil spill research and “suppressed” information until after consultations over the Trans Mountain pipeline were over, says a lawyer for the Tsleil-Waututh Nation.

Scott Smith argued Monday at the Federal Court of Appeal that Canada had failed again in its duty to consult in a meaningful way, in part by intentionally withholding information associated with the Tsleil-Waututh’s concerns about the pipeline expansion project.

14/12/19
Author: 
Chris Hatch
Protests against Canada in Madrid, Spain. Dec. 11, 2019. Photo by Indigenous Climate Action / Allan Lissner

December 13th 2019

Pity the poor staffers assigned to Canada’s negotiating team at COP25, they must be suffering whiplash.

11/12/19
Author: 
Robyn Allan
Prime Minister Justin Trudeau and Finance Minister Bill Morneau in Ottawa. Tuesday, March 19, 2019. Photography by The Canadian Press / Sean Kilpatrick

December 10th 2019

Ever since Finance Minister Bill Morneau announced the Liberal Cabinet decision to buy Trans Mountain from Kinder Morgan for $4.5 billion on May 29, 2018, Canadians have been asking “How much will this pipeline end up costing us?”

There are two price tags. First, the cost for the 66-year-old pipeline. And, second, the cost to build the expansion.

10/12/19
Author: 
Tzeporah Berman
 ‘Less than two months ago, two-thirds of Canadians voted for parties vowing to do more to fight climate change.’ Photograph: David Levene/The Guardian

Alberta’s oil sands produce one of the dirtiest oils on the planet. If the Teck mega mine is approved, the damage to our planet will be colossal

10 Dec 2019

This week, the Canadian government is in Madrid telling the world that climate action is its No 1 priority. When they get home, Justin Trudeau’s newly re-elected government will decide whether to throw more fuel on the fires of climate change by giving the go-ahead to construction of the largest open-pit oil sands mine in Canadian history.

10/12/19
Author: 
Alex Huntley
Jason Kenney Ottawa Dec. 2019

Dec. 9, 2019

OTTAWA – Police are advising the Canadian public to stay away from an aggressive panhandler from Alberta asking for billions and blocking any forward progress if his demands are not met.

The man is described as white, in his 50s, and is adamant that you owe him and his province something in return.

05/12/19
Author: 
Jillian Kestler-D’Amours and Megan O’Toole

This story was produced in partnership with the Pulitzer Center

Published: 5 Dec 2019

 

Canada has been hailed by some as a leader in the fight to combat climate change. But it is also moving forward with a project to expand a multibillion-dollar oil pipeline to the country's west coast.

The Trans Mountain pipeline has become a flashpoint for politicians, environmentalists and Indigenous groups, many of whom say they weren't adequately consulted on the project and fear a spill could harm their traditional territories.

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