LNG - Fracking

30/11/13
Author: 
Op Ed
LNG

British Columbians can be forgiven if they feel confused about the environmental effects of the liquefied natural gas industry proposed for northwestern B.C. The provincial government, sticking to a 2020 legislated target for reducing greenhouse gas emissions by one third, is pledging that LNG operations in Kitimat would be the cleanest in the world. But an environmental study last week by the SkeenaWild Conservation Trust is warning of a hot mess of pollution and contaminants should three LNG plants be built as planned.

27/11/13
Author: 
Joe Romm
Shutterstock

A major new study blows up the whole notion of natural gas as a short-term bridge fuel to a carbon-free economy. Natural gas is mostly methane (CH4), a potent heat-trapping gas. If, as now seems likely, natural gas production systems leak 2.7% (or more), then gas-fired power loses its near-term advantage over coal and becomes more of a gangplank than a bridge. Worse, without a carbon price, some gas displaces renewable energy, further undercutting any benefit it might have had.
 

Category: 
22/11/13
Author: 
Kevin Logan

The relationship is suffering,” or so goes the mantra in our mainstream press. For the last number of months, politicians, media and the talking heads have repeated the story that foreign investment – read Chinese – has fallen of a cliff and bi-lateral relations are frosty due to Harper’s “tough” new, yet undisclosed, policies on investments from foreign state-owned-enterprises (SOEs) in particular.

Category: 
21/11/13
Author: 
CP
Kitimat LNG

A British Columbia conservation group says proposed liquefied natural gas plants in the Kitimat area will burn up to two-and-a-half times more natural gas than is consumed in Metro Vancouver annually. The report, released by SkeenaWild Conservation Trust, says just three proposed plants in the district on B.C.’s northern coast will collectively burn 60 per cent of all the natural gas consumed annually in B.C. The B.C.

Category: 
18/11/13
Author: 
Damien Gillis and Will Koop
Frackwater pits in Talisman's Farell Creek operations

A pit storing contaminated fracking water in northeast BC was leaking into the surrounding soil and groundwater for up to six months before owner Talisman formally notified the Oil and Gas Commission and undertook clean-up efforts, The Common Sense Canadian has learned. One of five lined pits connected to Talisman’s Farrell Creek operations north of Hudson’s Hope, referred to as Pond A, suffered a puncture through both of its protective layers, causing toxic fluids to begin escaping into the environment.

16/11/13
Author: 
Mathew Robinson
Vancouver teens protest industry-funded Energy IQ educational materials

A pair of Vancouver high school students have written an open letter to Canadian Geographic in protest of the magazine delivering educational materials funded by oil and gas producers to classrooms.

14/11/13
Author: 
UNIFOR
UNIFOR

Unifor, Canada's largest energy union, is calling for a Canada-wide moratorium on all new oil and gas fracking. Already the provinces of Quebec and Newfoundland and Labrador have introduced moratoriums on fracking. Nova Scotia has banned fracking while undertaking a review. Unifor is now pushing for a national moratorium. Unifor is raising concerns about the safety and environmental risks associated with fracking as well as the lack of informed consent by First Nations about fracking activities on traditional lands.

13/11/13
Author: 
Damien Gillis
BC Pipelines

A new map (scroll down to view) reveals the full scope of oil and gas pipelines proposed to criss-cross BC. Compiled by Skeena Watershed Conservation Coalition and Skeena Wild, the graphic depicts the planned routes for a staggering six new pipelines – five designed to carry natural gas to proposed liquefaction (LNG) plants in Kitimat and Prince Rupert, plus the twin bitumen and condensate Northern Gateway pipeline proposed by Enbridge. Plans for an additional six gas pipelines have yet to be formalized.

13/11/13
Author: 
Stephen Smart

Premier Christy Clark is calling British Columbia's proposed liquefied natural-gas plants worldwide pollution-fighting machines, despite concerns by climate scientists and environmental groups that they will belch millions of tonnes of harmful greenhouse gas emissions into the sky. Clark says B.C. should sell natural gas in China and Japan because natural gas is cleaner than China's coal and safer than Japan's nuclear power. "We are doing the world a favour," she said.

12/11/13
Author: 
Justine Hunter

Internal B.C. government documents warn that the pursuit of a liquefied natural gas industry could double the province’s entire output of greenhouse-gas emissions – at a time that it’s struggling to meet its legislated targets to dramatically reduce GHGs. A cabinet document prepared for Environment Minister Mary Polak in June calculates the LNG sector could increase emissions by 16 per cent at a minimum, and as much as “a doubling of B.C.’s total emissions, depending on the number of plants and the technology and energy options chosen,” the document states.

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