LNG - Fracking

04/11/13
Author: 
Vaughn Palmer
NDP and Fracking

VICTORIA ­ As political protests go, the anti-fracking display at Premier Christy Clark’s house on the weekend was small-scale and short-lived. A dozen or so protesters put up a mock drill rig on her front lawn on Sunday morning and removed it soon afterward when asked to do so by police. Still, the episode had larger implications for both of B.C.’s major political parties. For the B.C. Liberals, the ill-advised trespass on the premier’s home turf generated sympathy more than any backlash over the widespread use of fracking to unlock the province’s natural gas reserves.

04/11/13

Premier Christy Clark said she’s excited about a proposal to modernize and expand port facilities in Port Alberni, which could include a new deep sea shipping terminal and a liquefied natural gas facility.

Clark said there’s been significant international interest in a Port Alberni LNG facility, which could be a huge job generator for the community. The premier has invited Port Alberni Port Authority to accompany her on a trade mission to Asia next month.

03/11/13
Author: 
Rising Tide
Fracking Christy Clark

VANCOUVER, UNCEDED COAST SALISH TERRITORY – On Sunday morning, activists with Rising Tide-Vancouver Coast Salish Territories set up a 15-foot mock fracking rig on Premier Christy Clark’s lawn and announced that “Because the Premier loves fracking, we figured we would save her the hassle of trying to take over other peoples’ homes and bring it right to her!” says Jacquelyn Fraser, an activist with the group. “We are just so worried about all the water that is being used and polluted in northeastern B.C. for fracking.

01/11/13

Carbon Talks brought together three experts at the lunch hour on Wednesday to discuss the business case for exporting LNG from B.C. Part of that business case is environmental: the assertion that LNG will be good for global emissions. Dr. Kathryn Harrison, professor of political science at UBC, suggested that climate change is an elephant in the room, a party animal when it suits industry needs or, perhaps, “a large beast with the potential to wreak havoc.”

30/10/13

By Roger Annis

Another oil train derailment and explosion in Canada has sent nearby residents fleeing from their homes in the middle of the night. It happened at 1 a.m. on Saturday, October 19 on a CN Rail line outside the hamlet of Gainford, Alberta, 85 km west of Edmonton. The accident coincides with new steps by the Canadian government to extend oil and other resource extraction into the Arctic.

28/10/13

The Calgary Herald

First Nations fear they are being cut out of a potential $2.5 billion windfall from the development of B.C.'s liquefied natural gas and mining sector and want the provincial government to mandate at least a quarter of those projects to use energy from B.C.'s independent power producers.

28/10/13

The current going price for water used for fracking is 'an insult,' said Eoin Madden, a campaigner from the Vancouver-based national conservation group Wilderness Committee.

Critics are raising alarms that oil and gas companies are getting a “free ride” from the provincial government for the billions of litres of water used in fracking operations every year.

Category: 
24/10/13

By Roger Annis, October 24, 2013

Another oil train derailment and explosion in Canada has sent nearby residents fleeing from their homes in the middle of the night. It happened at 1 am on Saturday, October 19 on a CN Rail line outside the hamlet of Gainford, Alberta, 85 km west of Edmonton. The accident coincides with new steps by the Canadian government to extend oil and other resource extraction into the Arctic.

22/10/13
Author: 
Martin Lukacs

The image of burning police cars played endlessly on the evening news. Television and talk radio blared out reports of "clashes" between police and indigenous protestors. Last Thursday in New Brunswick near the Elsipogtog First Nation, we were told the government had enforced an injunction against a blockade of a US shale gas company. There was nothing about the roots of a conflict years in the making. An appeal to the stereotype of indigenous violence was enough: once again, the natives were breaking the law; the police had to be sent in.

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