Oil - Pipelines

23/01/16
Author: 
Geoffrey Morgan
A man holds a sign while marching to a protest outside National Energy Board hearings on the proposed Trans Mountain pipeline expansion in Burnaby, B.C., on Tuesday January 19, 2016.

CALGARY – The process for reviewing pipeline projects in Canada is in flux, creating severe legal complications for lawyers on both sides of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project.

Changes are coming to the regulatory process that will affect Kinder Morgan Inc.’s Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, adding new regulatory hurdles for a project nearing the end of its current review process.

22/01/16
Author: 
Elizabeth McSheffrey
Elizabeth May begs the National Energy Board not to recommend approval of the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain expansion during the hearings in Burnaby, B.C. on Thurs. Jan. 21, 2016. Photo by Elizabeth McSheffrey.

Moments before Elizabeth May took the stand at the National Energy Board (NEB) hearings for Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, she admitted she was nervous.

 

“I don’t want to get too angry,” she told National Observer with a smile, organizing a massive stack of documents and pages upon pages of handwritten notes.

22/01/16
Author: 
David Dyck
(Left to right) Nower Nicola Band Chief Aaron Sam and Neskonlith Indian Band chief Judy Wilson announce their withdrawal from the NEB environmental assessment hearings, with Grand Chief Stewart Phillip looking on. (@earyn604/Twitter)

Lower Nicola Indian Band (LNIB) chief Aaron Sam was in the Lower Mainland earlier this week, boycotting what he calls a “flawed” environmental assessment process done by the federal government’s National Energy Board (NEB).

“We feel that what the government is going to do is a foregone conclusion,” Aaron told the Heraldin a phone interview.

21/01/16
Author: 
Roger Annis

A leading columnist in Canada's Globe and Mail daily newspaper known in the past to voice concern about the global warming emergency has penned two columns recently in support of Alberta tar sands pipelines, including praising the efforts of the premier of Alberta to sell the construction of these project to an increasingly sceptical and wary public in Canada

21/01/16
Author: 
Bertrans Marotte
TransCanada Corp.’s Energy East oil pipeline would be one of North America’s largest crude pipes, offering Alberta’s oil sands producers waiting for the Keystone XL line another way to reach customers by shipping across Canada to the Atlantic Coast. (TODD KOROL/REUTERS)

Montreal Mayor Denis Coderre and mayors of surrounding cities and boroughs say they are firmly opposed to TransCanada Corp.’s Energy East oil pipeline project, warning that the environmental risk far outweighs any economic benefits.

“They didn’t do their homework, obviously,” Mr. Coderre said on Thursday about Calgary-based TransCanada’s $15.7-billion pipeline that would move 1.1 million barrels of crude a day from Western Canada to East Coast refineries and shipping points and pass through heavily populated areas in the Montreal region.

21/01/16
Author: 
BC Civil Liberties Association
NEB Kinder Morgan empty room

 

 

 

Row after row of empty chairs line the room at the National Energy Board (NEB) hearing in Burnaby, where the hearings concerning the Kinder Morgan pipeline project are being held.

21/01/16
Author: 
Gene McGuckin
Kinder Morgan protest
Please forward widely, especially to contacts in the lower mainland, BC.

Sisters, Brothers, and Friends,

Yesterday’s warm-up protest against the Kinder Morgan National Energy Board hearings in Burnaby previews an equally energetic but much larger protest this coming Saturday, 1 p.m., at 4331 Dominion St.

“Trudeau, Keep Your Promises!” said one banner hanging from the Trans-Canada Highway overpass. Another read, “Re-Do Kinder Morgan Review!”

21/01/16
Author: 
Elizabeth McSheffrey
Katzie First Nation Chief Susan Miller (left) and her sister, Debbie Miller, stand with protesters outside the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain hearings in Burnaby, B.C. on Wed. Jan. 20, 2016. Photo by Elizabeth McSheffrey.

Katzie Nation Chief Susan Miller and her sister Debbie Miller of Katzie First Nation say they stand to lose everything if the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline expansion is approved.

 

Chief Miller said the continued expansion of pipeline projects and shrinking of Indigenous territories represents the ongoing assault on First Nations culture that started with the residential school system.

20/01/16
Author: 
Jeremy Deutsch
Union of B.C. Indian Chiefs Grand Chief Stewart Phillip, at centre holding sign, is joined by dozens of people rallying against the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion project and National Energy Board hearings taking place in Burnaby at the Delta Burnaby Hotel and Conference Centre.   Photograph By Cornelia Naylor

[Remember rally at the NEB on Saturday, Jan. 23 at 1 pm - see "Events"]

Carrying signs and a marching tune, dozens of people turned up to the Trans Mountain National Energy Board hearings in Burnaby to voice their opposition to the Kinder Morgan project. 

The rally was planned days before the hearings and was intended to send a message to the NEB, which was holding final arguments for intervenors inside the Delta Burnaby Hotel and Conference Centre Tuesday.

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