British Columbia

04/03/19
Author: 
Ben Parfitt
March 4, 2019
 

In April 2010, when then-premier Gordon Campbell announced that B.C. was resurrecting plans to build the Site C dam, atmospheric scientist Andrew Weaver was along to lend support.

Well before he became an MLA, and later the leader of the B.C. Green party, Weaver used words to describe the controversial project that became a template for Liberal and NDP premiers to come:

Hydro power is “clean.” It is “zero-emitting” power. It “does not produce greenhouse gas emissions.” Therefore, it is good.

28/02/19
Author: 
The Canadian Press
The latest figure on the cost of the dam is $10.7 billion and when complete on the Peace River in northeast B.C. it would power the equivalent of 450,000 homes a year. (THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward)

The trial was expected to start in 2022

Feb. 26, 2019 

The British Columbia government, BC Hydro and two First Nations have entered talks to avoid court action over the massive Site C hydroelectric dam.

The parties were in B.C. Supreme Court on Tuesday to set a 120-day trial that was expected to start in 2022.

28/02/19
Author: 
Norm Farrell

A study written for Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives by earth scientist J. David Hughes offered a conclusion on the success of neoliberal politics in Canada. Success, that is, for the corporate world.

A pull quote in the executive summary of the Hughes report provides the gist:

23/02/19
Author: 
Rita Wong, Mel Lehan, Barry Morris, Kyle Farquharson, Will Offley
Dear Sisters and Brothers,

As you will see from the attached materials, we are a group of defendants charged with blocking the Kinder Morgan expansion project last year.  We will be going on trial in April charged with criminal contempt of court, and facing both fines and jail terms if convicted.  We are raising a defence of necessity with the goal of changing Canadian legal precedent if we are successful, which would have significant positive consequences for climate defenders facing charges for peaceful civil disobedience in the future.

20/02/19
Author: 
Laura Ryckewaert

FEB. 18, 2019

B.C. lawyer Eugene Kung says he would be ‘very surprised’ if the Trans Mountain reconsideration process isn’t challenged in court.

15/02/19

[Web page editor: Support for fracked LNG makes BC Premier Horgan a leading agent of climate disruption.] 

Feb 15, 2019 - Measures to help build the $40-billion LNG Canada project will be introduced this spring, the B.C. government announced on Thursday. 

Northern B.C. and rural communities saw little mention in the government's latest throne speech, read Tuesday afternoon by Lt.-Gov. Janet Austin. However, the province dedicated five paragraphs to the liquefied natural gas industry and the LNG Canada project. Here's what was said:

10/02/19
Author: 
Robyn Allan

February 8th 2019

Trans Mountain is on track to deliver Canadian oil producers a $2-billion taxpayer-funded toll subsidy for capacity on its existing pipeline and has asked the federal pipeline regulator, the National Energy Board (NEB) for permission.

If the NEB approves the toll application Trans Mountain has filed with it, it will shift the burden for the roughly $3 billion Ottawa paid to buy the regulated assets onto Canadians, rather than into tolls charged to shippers where the recovery of these costs belongs.

08/02/19
Author: 
Laura Kane
The Canadian Press

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee says his state shares concerns with British Columbia about the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion and will continue to voice its objections any way it can.

Inslee made the comments at a joint news conference in Seattle on Thursday with B.C. Premier John Horgan, who is visiting the state to discuss partnerships on endangered killer whales, clean energy and high-speed rail.

08/02/19
Author: 
Richard Littlemore
retired lawyer David Gooderham among his files on climate change at home in Vancouver, B.C. on Jan. 25, 2019. Photo by Michael Ruffolo

February 7th 2019

Retired lawyer David Gooderham, 73, may soon cap a distinguished career in law with a 28-day jail sentence for contempt of court for joining protesters who have gathered to block work on the Trans Mountain pipeline.

But he says it’s worth the risk if it gives him a chance to trigger the first-ever court hearing in Canada on the validity of the science of climate change and the implications of federal pipeline policy.

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