Fisheries

07/03/19
Author: 
Christopher Pollon
The Skeena River. Photo: Sam Beebe / Flickr

Feb. 28, 2019

A rushed process that emphasizes hatcheries and coastal fisheries over habitat restoration and inland spawning streams has some worried the province’s new plan is meant, first and foremost, to serve commercial fishing interests

Efforts to create a made-in-B.C. strategy to assure the future abundance of wild salmon is off to a rocky start — marred by rushed consultations and a process dominated by coastal fishing interests, leaving environmentalists, scientists and interior communities on the outside looking in.

04/03/19
Author: 
Damian Carrington
Ocean heatwaves destroy kelp forests, which provide food and shelter for many other species. Photograph: Thomas Schmitt/Getty Images

The number of heatwaves affecting the planet’s oceans has increased sharply, scientists have revealed, killing swathes of sea-life like “wildfires that take out huge areas of forest”.

The damage caused in these hotspots is also harmful for humanity, which relies on the oceans for oxygen, food, storm protection and the removal of climate-warming carbon dioxide the atmosphere, they say.

26/02/19
Author: 
Laura Poppick
Zooplankton. Credit: Matt Wilson/Jay Clark, NOAA NMFS AFSC Wikimedia

February 25, 2019

Widespread and sometimes drastic marine oxygen declines are stressing sensitive species—a trend that will continue with climate change

20/02/19
Author: 
Laura Ryckewaert

FEB. 18, 2019

B.C. lawyer Eugene Kung says he would be ‘very surprised’ if the Trans Mountain reconsideration process isn’t challenged in court.

11/01/19
Author: 
Sarah Cox

In an unprecedented move, the Dzawada’enuzw nation is claiming in court that farming Atlantic salmon — which often carry disease — in their traditional waters constitutes a violation of Aboriginal rights

Jan 10, 2019 7 min read

Willie Moon’s family used to catch hundreds of salmon a day on B.C.’s Kingcome River, ensuring a winter supply of smoked fish for members of the remote Dzawada’enuxw First Nation.

11/01/19
Author: 
Andrew Nikiforuk
The politician who once promised to use ‘every tool in the toolbox’ to protect B.C.’s coastal economy and environment now appears mostly tool-less and toothless. Photo: BC Government Flickr.

BC still opposes the project, but it’s not leading.

When the National Energy Board announced conditional approval for the Trans Mountain pipeline project in 2016, BC NDP leader John Horgan sent party members an important letter.

10/01/19
Author: 
First Nations Leaders

News Release

January 10, 2019

 

UBCIC Statement of Clarity in Response to Premier Horgan’s Comments on Unist’ot’en

 

05/12/18
Author: 
Holly Lake
B.C. First Nations chiefs call for Senate support of supertanker moratorium

Dec 5, 2018 

A delegation of First Nations chiefs from British Columbia descended on Parliament Hill Tuesday with a message for the Senate: If senators allow supertankers through their territory, reconciliation efforts will be sunk.

They’re urging Ottawa to pass Bill C-48, The Oil Tanker Moratorium Act. The government bill received support in the House of Commons in May and is now before the Senate, where it’s running into opposition. 

24/11/18
Author: 
Robyn Allan

Nov. 23, 2018

When it set out to expand the Trans Mountain pipeline, Kinder Morgan knew it faced serious marine transport safety hurdles. In February 2013, Kinder Morgan Canada president, Ian Anderson told the National Energy Board that, “One of the greatest challenges I believe in providing British Columbians with the confidence and trust will be confidence and trust that the tanker traffic industry itself can be operated safely through that port.” (paragraph 1176)

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