Climate Change

12/11/15
Author: 
Matt Robinson
A oil tanker is guided by tug boats as it goes under the Lions Gate Bridge. The Liberals are not opposed to the Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion which would mean a lot more tankers on this waterway. But they will insist on a tougher environmental review. Photograph by: JONATHAN HAYWARD , THE CANADIAN PRESS

Business, environmental and community groups are pushing for Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to shut down a pair of pipeline reviews before heading to Paris for climate talks.

The City of Burnaby, the Georgia Strait Alliance, Greenpeace Canada and the Natural Resources Defense Council are among 100 groups seeking a halt to National Energy Board reviews of Kinder Morgan’s Trans Mountain expansion and TransCanada’s Energy East proposal. In a joint letter sent Thursday to Trudeau, the groups say the reviews should be put on pause until fundamental flaws in the process are fixed.

12/11/15
Author: 
Charles Mandel

“The TPP is an act of climate denial,” said Jason Kowalski, the U.S. policy director at 350.org.

“It denies the scientific imperative to leave fossil fuels in the ground by granting corporations incredible powers over the sovereign right of countries to fight climate change on their own.”

At issue is the investor state dispute settlement (ISDS) mechanism included in the trade deal. ISDS’s allow foreign investors to use a secret tribunal to launch a lawsuit if they believe government actionsmight affect their future profits.

12/11/15
Author: 
Reuters

Any global climate change deal reached in Paris next month will be legally binding and have a concrete impact, France’s foreign minister said on Thursday, reacting to US comments that questioned the status of the accord.

The US secretary of state, John Kerry, was quoted as telling Wednesday’s Financial Times that December’s agreement was “definitively not going to be a treaty”.

But his French counterpart, Laurent Fabius, said on Thursday that, unlike previous negotiations, the Paris talks were not just “hot air” and Kerry was perhaps “confused”.

Category: 
12/11/15
Author: 
Sightline Institute Staff

For Immediate Release: November 12, 2015

 

Contact:          Eric de Place, eric@sightline.org, 206-447-1880 x105

 

Oil Industry Turns to Pacific Northwest Oil Train Terminals in Wake of Keystone Rejection

New report shows controversial facilities would boost oil extraction and climate-warming pollution.

 

12/11/15
Author: 
Margo McDiarmid
The processing facility at the Suncor oilsands operations near Fort McMurray, Alta. A new report from Oil Change International finds that G20 countries are spending $452 billion US a year subsidizing their fossil fuel industries. (Todd Korol/Reuters)

This column is part of a package of special coverage of climate change issues by CBC News leading up to the United Nations climate change conference (COP21) being held in Paris from Nov. 30 to Dec. 11.

G20 countries are spending $452 billion US a year subsidizing their fossil fuel industries and are undermining the world's effort to combat climate change in the process, according to a new international report by an environmental advocacy group.

11/11/15
Author: 
Brandi Morin
Elder Violet Poitras on the Paul First Nation. The TransAlta generating station sits in the background. Photo: Native Counselling Services of Alberta.

With the world focusing on climate change leading up to the COP21 United Nations gathering in Paris at the end of November, some Indigenous elders in Canada say it’s an issue that they’ve been witnessing unfold for decades.

Francois Paulette from Smith Landing First Nation in the Northwest Territories (NWT) has been speaking out about changes to the landscape in his home territory.

“The north is a very sensitive, delicate place with impacts from pollution to the air and water,” said Paulette.

10/11/15
Author: 
Jeff Rubin
The market glut is from increased output from high-cost producers like the oil sands. (TODD KOROL/REUTERS)

Lost in the political fallout from President Barack Obama’s decision to once and for all reject Keystone XL is the fact that there is no longer an economic context for the pipeline. For that matter, the same can be said for any of the other proposed pipelines that would service the planned massive expansion of production from Alberta’s oil sands.

10/11/15
Author: 
Mychaylo Prystupa

Suncor Refinery outside of Fort McMurray with the Syncrude Refinery visible in the background. Photo by Colin O'Connor, Greenpeace.

Alberta and its oil sands needs to be the focus of the Trudeau government's climate action if it is serious about helping limit dangerous planetary warming to two degrees this century, warned a national group of environmental thinkers.

06/11/15
Author: 
Charles Mandel

[Webpage editor's note: A good summary of the history of this project.] 

After seven years of acrimonious court battles, profligate spending and hardball political lobbying, the Keystone XL pipeline is dead. U.S. President Barack Obama rejected the proposal, as most suspected he would.

"Several years ago, the State Department began a review process for the proposed construction of a pipeline that would carry Canadian crude oil through our heartland to ports in the Gulf of Mexico and out into the world market," said Obama in a press conference on Friday November 6.

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Climate Change