Global

31/10/17
Author: 
Matt McGrath
GETTY IMAGES Image caption Emissions from human activities have levelled off but concentrations in the atmosphere continue to grow

30 October 2017

Concentrations of CO2 in the Earth's atmosphere surged to a record high in 2016, according to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

Last year's increase was 50% higher than the average of the past 10 years.

Researchers say a combination of human activities and the El Niño weather phenomenon drove CO2 to a level not seen in 800,000 years.

Scientists say this risks making global temperature targets largely unattainable.

24/10/17
Author: 
Jessica Clogg & Andrew Gage

The past year has seen communities around the world dealing with major weather events. Here in Canada flooding in Quebec and unprecedented wildfires in BC displaced tens of thousands, while the southern U.S. and South East Asia suffered from intense storms. Forget about polar bears – these communities are the new face of climate change.

22/10/17
Author: 
Julia Conley
Nine-year-old Andre is one of seven children suing 47 European nations with the help of the Global Legal Action Network, arguing that the countries are not doing enough to combat climate change. (Photo: Bentler/Twitter)

"Whether we like it or not, we are going to be the main ones affected by the consequences that climate change entails."

 

Seven children in Portugal have hit their crowdfunding target for a lawsuit they are mounting against are 47 member nations of the Council of Europe—which they say are not doing enough to fight climate change.

The children initially hoped to raise £20,000 (about $26,000)—a goal they reached Thursday after less than a month of crowdfunding. They're now hoping to raise a total of £100,000.

20/10/17
Author: 
The Associated Press
A man walks in front of a group of people during heavy smog at a the Temple of Heaven park in Beijing in December 2016. A new report in the Lancet shows China had the second highest percentage of deaths linked to pollution worldwide. (Wang Zhao/AFP/Getty Images)

At least 9 million premature deaths were caused by diseases from toxic emissions

Posted: Oct 20, 2017 7:51 AM ET Last Updated: Oct 20, 2017 10:49 AM ET

Environmental pollution — from filthy air to contaminated water — is killing more people every year than all war and violence in the world. More than smoking, hunger or natural disasters. More than AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria combined.

17/10/17
Author: 
Harvey Wasserman
St. Lucie Nuclear Power Plant at Port St. Lucie, Florida

Although the mainstream media said next to nothing about it, independent experts have made it clear that Hurricanes Harvey and Irma threatened six U.S. nuclear plants with major destruction, and therefore all of us with apocalyptic disaster. It is a danger that remains for the inevitable hurricanes, earthquakes, tsunamis and other natural disasters yet to come.

16/10/17
Author: 
Elizabeth McSheffrey

A major French bank has joined a growing group of international businesses, schools and financial institutions that have pledged to go fossil fuel-free with their investments as the world collectively strives to avoid climate change disaster.

14/10/17
Author: 
Elisabeth O'Leary

EDINBURGH (Reuters) - Scotland will block fracking indefinitely after a public consultation found overwhelming opposition to the practice, the British region’s energy minister said on Tuesday in a victory for environmentalists.

14/10/17
Author: 
Vijay Prashad
People wade through a flooded street in Havana, Cuba, on September 10 after the passage of Hurricane Irma. Photo: Ramon Espinosa/AP

One island, a poor socialist state with infrastructure in grave need of modernisation, has slowly emerged out of the chaos caused by a hurricane’s wrath, while the other, a territory of the richest country in the world, cannot see the light at the end of the tunnel. By 

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