Oil by Rail

01/02/16
Author: 
Ricardo Acuna

[Webpage editor's note: A fine example of evading the cardinal issue of emissions and climate change]

30/01/16
Author: 
Geoffrey Morgan and Yadullah Hussain

The Alberta government’s $3 million royalty review, which had the energy industry tied in knots for months, turned out to be an expensive lesson.

27/01/16
Author: 
Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois

I sometimes forget the degree to which a large part of English Canada despises Quebec. This week, the reminder was brutal.

27/01/16
Author: 
Gabriel Nadeau-Dubois

I sometimes forget the degree to which a large part of English Canada despises Quebec. This week, the reminder was brutal.

23/01/16
Author: 
Shawn McCarthy

[Website editor's note: This article is a useful summary of  provincial emission-reduction policies, or rather the lack thereof.]

Provincial premiers boast leadership in the country’s effort to cut greenhouse gas emissions, but achieving their own lofty ambitions will require political courage and aggressive policies to drive fundamental changes in the way Canadians produce and consume energy.

23/01/16
Author: 
Keiko Budech
Photo: Oil trains in Everette Washington (Paul K. Anderson)
 
This article is part of the series The Northwest's Pipeline on Rails
21/01/16
Author: 
Roger Annis

A leading columnist in Canada's Globe and Mail daily newspaper known in the past to voice concern about the global warming emergency has penned two columns recently in support of Alberta tar sands pipelines, including praising the efforts of the premier of Alberta to sell the construction of these project to an increasingly sceptical and wary public in Canada

14/01/16
Author: 
Thane Maxwell

Building and expanding crude-oil pipelines will not get oil trains off our railways. I repeat, building pipelines will not get oil trains off our railways. We do have serious rail congestion and derailment problems, but new pipelines will not solve either. The choice between rail and pipeline is a myth. Media coverage and public-policy discourse are consistently wrong about this. People have a right to know the truth, and policy decisions should be based on fact.

08/01/16
Author: 
Jeffrey Jones

On the surface, the Sturgeon refinery project has just about everything Albertans would hope for as their economy sputters.

It will create jobs by processing scads of gooey crude from the oil sands into diesel fuel. It has long-term bitumen supply agreements with the province and one of Canada's largest oil companies.
 
Its carbon emissions will be piped away for use in old oil reservoirs to help produce leftover crude rather than vented into the atmosphere. That fits well with the province's new climate framework.

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