Barry Saxifrage
Where the pollution from Alberta's 12 billion barrels of bitumen has ended up. IPCC data. Background image by NASA/Goddard. Chart by Barry Saxifrage

Lost in the heated arguments over Kinder Morgan's proposed Trans Mountain pipeline is this simple fact: more than a quarter of the bitumen flowing through it will end up as pollution spilling into our oceans — one way or the other.

All the bitumen that doesn't spill from pipelines or tankers gets burned, ending up as carbon pollution dumped into our environment. Over one quarter ends up in the oceans, acidifying them for millennia to come.



An appeal to the provincial government to reconsider its decision.

Martin Empson
China has the largest hydroelectric dam in the world. Pic: Rehman/Wikimedia
February 2018
Martin Empson examines the contradictions behind the green rhetoric of the Chinese government and its continued reliance on fossil fuels.
Emma Gilchrist

Canadian governments are sitting by and watching as endangered species disappear, in what one environmental lawyer calls a “slow moving catastrophe.”

The latest blow comes as a deadline for provinces to outline plans to protect threatened caribou habitat blew by without a single province meeting the deadline.

Nelson Bennett

Regulator’s management of fracking dams, release of timely information among concerns - Jan. 23, 2018

Investment in northeastern B.C.’s gas fields has soared in the last several years, thanks to the abundance of gas and liquids in the Montney formation and the promise of a new liquefied natural gas industry developing.

Jeakins said the commission’s annual budget of $50 million and staff of 250 have kept pace with the industry’s growth.

CBC staff The Current
The Iranian oil tanker Sanchi is engulfed in fire in the East China Sea, on Jan. 13, 2018. (China Daily via Reuters)

It's an oil spill the size of Paris. But only now is the world's attention catching up with the vast scale of the disaster in the East China Sea — the largest tanker spill in decades.

The crash itself happened weeks ago when an Iranian tanker called the Sanchi collided with a Chinese freighter on January 6 and burst into flames, later sinking. Thirty-two crew members are presumed dead.

Gloria Dickie

January 18, 2018

Shortly before 4 p.m. on November 26, 2017, a U.S. barge carrying 3.5 million litres of diesel to Alaska broke free from its tugboat, the Jake Shearer, off the rocky shore of British Columbia’s Goose Island. Westerly winds were blowing at 45 knots while rain all but sandblasted the side of the barge, now anchored precariously in rough waters. The Canadian Coast Guard vessel deployed from Prince Rupert, approximately 300 kilometres away, wasn’t expected to reach the stranded barge until 7:30 p.m. at the earliest.

First Nations Leaders

(Fort St. John, B.C., Treaty 8 Territory, Jan 16, 2018) – The West Moberly and Prophet River First Nations have filed notices of civil action alleging that the Site C hydroelectric project, together with the two previous dams on the Peace River, unjustifiably infringes their constitutional rights under Treaty 8, stating:  

Ken Boon
Ken Boon (left) attends a Site C open house in Fort St. John on July 9, 2015, at the Pomeroy Hotel. Photo By WILLIAM STODALKA

Jan. 10/18

It has been a month now since the BC government announced that Site C would continue. The accounting rationale used by Premier Horgan makes absolutely no sense in light of the findings from the recent BCUC review, and the much greater financial woes of continuing the project.

Rita Wong

Premier Horgan announced in December that his government would proceed with the Site C dam, increasing its budget by more than 2 billion dollars despite having opposed it before.


Subscribe to RSS - Ecology/Environment