Ecology/Environment

31/01/20
Author: 
Charlie Smith
Minister George Heyman's office Jan. 27, 2020

January 27th, 2020

The federal and provincial governments, LNG Canada, and Coastal GasLink Pipeline Ltd. all thought that a $40-billion fossil-fuel project would proceed in B.C. after proponents signed deals with 20 elected First Nations chiefs and councils.

But they may have underestimated the degree of public goodwill for Wet'suwet'en hereditary chiefs who are resisting a natural-gas pipeline that will provide fuel for the LNG plant near Kitimat.

26/01/20
Author: 
Nick Estes
Activists participate in a protest against the Dakota Access Pipeline March 10, 2017 in Washington, DC. Alex Wong / Getty Images

08.06.2019

The Green New Deal can connect every struggle to climate change. A Red Deal can build on those connections, tying Indigenous liberation to an anti-capitalist fight to save the planet.

2016 was the hottest year on record — so far. It also marked historic Indigenous-led protests against the Dakota Access Pipeline at Standing Rock.

25/01/20
Author: 
Excerpted from “Existential climate-related security risk: A scenario approach”, by David Spratt and Ian Dunlop

https://www.breakthroughonline.org.au/papers


Existential climate-related security risk: A scenario approach
 

Foreword by Admiral Chris Barrie, AC RAN Retired
 

24/01/20
Author: 
Damian Carrington
open pit mining - Photo: Pixabay License

This story was originally published by The Guardian and appears here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration

21/01/20
Author: 
First Nations Leaders
‘Is this a scorecard of how many First Nations say yes compared to those who say no? Is that how we measure rights and title?’ Photo by Michael Toledano.

Premiered Nov 1, 2019

 

 

Watch here.

 

[Photo: ‘Is this a scorecard of how many First Nations say yes compared to those who say no? Is that how we measure rights and title?’ Photo by Michael Toledano.]

 

 

 

21/01/20
Author: 
Kate Lyons
The UN decision relates to the case of Ioane Teitiota, who lived on South Tarawa atoll in Kiribati, one of the most vulnerable nations to climate-related sea level rise. Photograph: Dmitry Malov/Alamy

Jan. 20, 2020

Experts say judgment is ‘tipping point’ that opens the door to climate crisis claims for protection

It is unlawful for governments to return people to countries where their lives might be threatened by the climate crisis, a landmark ruling by the United Nations human rights committee has found.

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