Ecology/Environment

13/12/21
Author: 
Nick Cunningham
Activists protest Jordan Cove LNG in Salem, OR. June, 2016. Credit: Francis Eatherington (CC BY-NC 2.0)

Dec.6, 2021

A coalition of Oregon landowners, environmental groups, and Native tribes fended off Jordan Cove for more than a decade. But the legal implications of the project’s demise outside of Oregon are unclear.

Oregon’s 15-year battle against the Jordan Cove LNG project quietly came to an end on December 1, bringing relief to dozens of landowners that live in the path of the proposed project. 

13/12/21
Author: 
Kevin Rawlinson
Activists on the roof of a DLR train at Canary Wharf station on 25 April 2019. Photograph: Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty

Dec. 10, 2021

Group of six argued obstruction in London’s financial district was lawful protest against government inaction

Six climate crisis activists whose protest halted transport links serving London’s financial district have been acquitted by a jury.

10/12/21
Author: 
Damian Carrington
A healthy coral reef in Sulawesi, Indonesia. Photograph: Tim Lamont/University of Exeter

Dec. 8, 2021

Vibrant soundscape shows Indonesian reef devastated by blast fishing is returning to health

watch and listen here: https://youtu.be/97M2muq9JQc

From whoops to purrs, snaps to grunts, and foghorns to laughs, a cacophony of bizarre fish songs have shown that a coral reef in Indonesia has returned rapidly to health.

10/12/21
Author: 
Matt Simmons (Local Journalism Initiative Reporter)
A worker stands on a newly cut access road for the Coastal GasLink pipeline near Houston, B.C., in 2019. Since then, the company has faced 11 non-compliance orders from the environmental assessment office for contravening its operating permit. Photo: Amber Bracken / The Narwhal

Dec. 8, 2021

B.C’s environmental assessment office has issued 11 orders to Coastal GasLink since the project began, including three in November

Jerry cans of gas in an overflowing pool of water. Oil barrels lying on the ground. A dumpster filled to the brim, its lid propped open and bags of garbage left out in bear country. Murky water flowing into wetlands, lakes, streams and rivers. 

10/12/21
Author: 
Stephanie Wood
Kechika River runs through Dene K’éh Kusān, an area proposed for protection by the Kaska Dena. But the B.C. government isn't on side and hasn't designated any large conservation areas in more than a decade. Photo: Taylor Roades / The Narwhal

Dec. 9, 2021

Canada pledged to protect 25 per cent of land and water by 2025, but British Columbia has added only one percentage point in the past decade. Many say Indigenous protected areas are the way forward. Will the province agree?

British Columbia still hasn’t endorsed the federal government’s promise to protect 25 per cent of lands and oceans in Canada by 2025, leading conservationists and First Nations to call on the province to support more Indigenous Protected and Conserved Areas in the face of climate change and biodiversity loss.

10/12/21
Author: 
Lasse Gustavsson
Kelp forests sequester massive stores of carbon but the need for protecting these ocean-based solutions to climate change, and investing in 'seaforestation' to grow their potential, is rarely discussed. Photo: Maxwel Hohn / Ocean Wise

Dec. 2, 2021

Ocean forests could be the key to limiting global warming, but underwater solutions are often overlooked

Lasse Gustavsson is the president and CEO of Ocean Wise Conservation Association.

10/12/21
Author: 
Jessica Corbett
An international coalition is warning world leaders that corporate-backed "nature-based solutions" are scams that will lead to "dispossessions" while failing to help mitigate the climate emergency. (Photo: tcareob72/Shutterstock)

But in Canada we now have this!!

Dec. 7 - Canada announces $200 million for "nature-based solutions"

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