Ecology/Environment

12/02/21
Author: 
Indigenous Leaders
First Nations design on bridge

As we reach the one year anniversary of the brutal raids on Wet'suwet'en territory and the wave of incredible action across Turtle Island, the struggle continues despite the challenges of COVID-19. 

11/02/21
Author: 
Fiona Harvey
Fish mortality has more than quadrupled, from 3% in 2002 to about 13.5% in 2019, in Scottish salmon farms alone. Photograph: Robert F Bukaty/AP

Feb. 11, 2021

Report says pollution, parasites and fish mortality rates cost an estimated $50bn globally from 2013 to 2019

Salmon farming is wreaking ruin on marine ecosystems, through pollution, parasites and high fish mortality rates which are causing billions of pounds a year in damage, a new assessment of the global salmon farming industry has found.

10/02/21
Author: 
Alexis Baden-Mayer

February 2, 2021

On January 27, 2021, President Joe Biden signed his “Executive Order on Tackling the Climate Crisis at Home and Abroad.” This historic action commited the U.S. to achieving “significant short-term global reductions in greenhouse gas emissions and net-zero global emissions by mid-century or before.”

 

10/02/21
Author: 
Carl Meyer
Canopy executive director Nicole Rycroft stands next to straw bales at Columbia Pulp Mill in Washington. Rycroft photo

February 9th 2021

For Nicole Rycroft, the first modern, tree-free commercial-scale pulp mill in North America was a “lightbulb moment” about the climate crisis.

The new mill in eastern Washington state, called Columbia Pulp, runs entirely without woodchips.

Instead, it makes pulp, for paper products like tissues and food containers, out of some of the hundreds of millions of tonnes of wheat straw that is left over after farmers harvest their grain.

03/02/21
Author: 
Jessica Corbett
Water protectors protested at a construction site for the Line 3 pipeline near Cloquet, Minnesota on February 2, 2021. (Photo: Line 3 Media Collective)

Feb. 2, 2021

"We are endangering future generations," said Charles King, who locked himself to construction equipment, "and that's got to stop."

After three protesters were arrested on Monday at a Minnesota construction site for Enbridge's Line 3 pipeline, more than 50 water protectors on Tuesday marched onto an easement—with two people locking themselves to an excavator—and temporarily shut down work on the contested tar sands project.

02/02/21
Author: 
Carl Meyer
Rep. Ilhan Omar (centre), the whip for the Congressional Progressive Caucus, appears on Jan. 30 with Indigenous leaders organizing to stop Enbridge's Line 3 pipeline project in Minnesota. Omar photo / Twitter

February 2nd 2021

Canada’s federal government is voicing its support for Calgary-based Enbridge’s Line 3 project in northern Minnesota as opposition to the pipeline’s construction intensifies.

02/02/21
Author: 
Kenny Stancil
"There is still an opportunity for us to stop" the construction of Line 3, said Rep. Ilhan Omar (D-Minn.) on Saturday, January 30, 2021. "It is going to be really important for people to raise their voice." (Photo: Giniw Collective/Twitter)

January 30, 2021

"We owe it to future generations, to the Indigenous communities we've signed treaties with, and to every living being on this planet to stop building fossil fuel infrastructure."
 

Democratic Rep. Ilhan Omar of Minnesota traveled to the northern part of her state on Saturday to meet with Indigenous leaders and environmental justice advocates who are organizing opposition to Enbridge's Line 3 pipeline project.

28/01/21
Author: 
Marc Fawcett-Atkinson
Only nine per cent of Canada's plastic waste is recycled. A new coalition of businesses, environmental organizations, and governments say that can change, but critics are doubtful. Photo by Greenpeace

January 28th 2021

Every year, Canadians create hundreds of thousands of tonnes of plastic waste, almost half of it from packaging. Despite Canadians' diligent efforts at curbside recycling, most of it ends up in landfills. That might be changing.

26/01/21
Author: 
Amy Smart in Vancouver - Canadian Press
The Site C Dam location is seen along the Peace River in Fort St. John, B.C., Tuesday, April 18, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

January 25th 2021

MOBERLY LAKE, B.C. — A First Nations leader is calling on the British Columbia government to release several reports on the Site C dam, claiming details of escalating costs and safety concerns have been "shrouded in secrecy."

In an open letter to Premier John Horgan, Chief Roland Willson of the West Moberly First Nations says work on the hydroelectric dam in northeastern B.C. should be suspended immediately until cabinet makes a decision on the project.

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