Fisheries

27/09/17
Author: 
Randy Shore
California anchovy may actually thrive in the future, taking advantage of changing conditions and exploiting available resources, especially where other species are suffering. HANDOUT / PNG

A new study from UBC analyzed more 1,000 aquatic species for vulnerability to the effects of climate change, and the news for three B.C. food fish is not good. William Cheung — an associate professor at the Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries — brought together biological data relevant to adaptability and applied “fuzzy logic” to the computations. The exercise identified 294 marine species worldwide that are most at-risk due to climate change by 2050. Here are some highlights for species native to B.C. waters:

27/09/17
Author: 
National Observer & The Canadian Press

The National Energy Board has issued a stern warning to the company building a major west coast pipeline expansion about apparent violations of federal law.

 

The federal regulator called Kinder Morgan to task this week for installing mats in streams to discourage fish from spawning where the pipeline is to be built.

18/09/17
Author: 
The Associated Press
Salmon circle just below the surface inside a lock where they joined boats heading from salt water Shilshole Bay into fresh water Salmon Bay at the Ballard Locks in Seattle. The mass of warm water known as 'the blob' that heated up the North Pacific Ocean has dissipated, but scientists are still seeing the lingering effects of those unusually warm sea surface temperatures on Northwest salmon and steelhead. ELAINE THOMPSON / ASSOCIATED PRESS

The mass of warm water known as “the blob” that heated up the North Pacific Ocean has dissipated, but scientists are still seeing the lingering effects of those unusually warm sea surface temperatures on Pacific Northwest salmon and steelhead.

SEATTLE — The mass of warm water known as “the blob” that heated up the North Pacific Ocean has dissipated, but scientists are still seeing the lingering effects of those unusually warm sea surface temperatures on Pacific Northwest salmon and steelhead.

01/09/17
Author: 
Laura Kane
Protesters gather at the Marine Harvest fish farm on Swanson Island, near Alert Bay, B.C. in a handout photo from the Facebook page Swanson Occupation. Ernest Alfred, 36, sitting cross-legged on the right wearing a cedar bark neck ring, sits with other traditional leaders from neighbouring villages. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Facebook-Swanson Occupation MANDATORY CREDIT

PORT HARDY, B.C. — Members of two British Columbia First Nations say they have occupied a salmon farm on a small island on the province’s coast, the second such protest to be held in the past week.

Chief Willie Moon, also known as Okwilagame, said about 16 members of the Musgamagw Dzawada’enuxw and the Kwikwasutinuxw Haxwamis arrived at the Wicklow Point salmon farm on Thursday afternoon.

He said about five protesters plan to stay until the provincial and federal governments revoke permits for the facility on Broughton Island, about 50 kilometres east of Port Hardy.

29/08/17
Author: 
Mike Hager
fish farm wreckage

British Columbia’s new NDP government campaigned on a promise to transition the province’s fish-farming industry away from open-sea pens to land-based sites, but First Nations are pushing for more aggressive action. They want the province to revoke the licences of unwanted salmon farms operating in their territorial waters.

B.C.’s aquaculture industry was once again in the spotlight last week after thousands of Atlantic salmon may have escaped a Washington State fish farm near the border.

25/08/17
Author: 
First Nations Leaders

August 24, 2017. For immediate release.  Ernest Alexandra Alfred and a small group have peacefully occupied the Marine Harvest salmon farm, Swanson Island.  They state that they will remain on the farm until their chiefs are satisfied that the Province of BC has cancelled that farm’s Licence of Occupation and thus it has to leave the territory. The farm is located 17km east of Alert Bay.

 

24/08/17
Author: 
First Nations Leaders

At the Eleventh-Hour, BC’s Wild Salmon in Crisis

 

(Coast Salish Territory/Vancouver, B.C. – August 24, 2017) The Union of BC Indian Chiefs (UBCIC) and the First Nations Wild Salmon Alliance (FNWSA) are shocked and infuriated by Cook Aquaculture’s release of 305,000 specimens of an invasive salmon species into the waters of BC and Washington.

 

The UBCIC and the FNWSA have continuously advocated for the removal of open net-pen salmon farms in our waters and for BC and Canada to support a transition to on-land closed-containment aquaculture.

 

13/06/17
Author: 
WWF-Canada

Widespread disturbances dispel the notion of a nation of pristine waters

23/01/17
Author: 
Jeff Matthews

Posted: 04/21/2015 5:22 pm EDT Updated: 06/21/2015 5:59 am EDT

This month's bunker fuel spill in Vancouver's English Bay was a stark reminder of just what is at stake as resource industries lay claim to more and more of our coastline. The accident has already re-energized the debate over the Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion and the increased tanker traffic that will accompany it. But, notably absent from this debate is the one group most Vancouverites look to on issues affecting our oceans -- the Vancouver Aquarium.

08/01/17
Author: 
Laurie Gourlay

Even if twinning the Kinder-Morgan pipeline doesn’t go ahead, the Salish Sea will not be saved — unless something bold, principled and practical is done, and soon.

The endangered southern resident Orca whales, the depleting fisheries of Puget Sound, the sewage dumps into Juan de Fuca Strait, the toxic leachates from old mineshafts and coal-storage pits along the Island’s east coast, and the plans that would see industrial sites such as an LNG plant located in Howe Sound: these all point to incremental destruction. As it stands now a long, slow death awaits the Salish Sea.

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