USA

02/10/16
Author: 
Democracy Now

We speak with 350.org’s Bill McKibben about how the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe and members of hundreds of other tribes from across the U.S., Canada and Latin America have resisted construction of the $3.8 billion Dakota Access pipeline, even as police carrying assault rifles responded to them with armored vehicles, tear gas and helicopters. "We cannot pump more oil," McKibben says.

02/10/16
Author: 
Deirdre Fulton
A #NoDAPL solidarity event in Oakland, California earlier this month. (Photo: Peg Hunter/flickr/cc)

Meanwhile, a Reuters investigation finds pipeline spill detection system severely flawed

Close to 100 scientists have signed onto a letter decrying "inadequate environmental and cultural impact assessments" for the Dakota Access Pipeline (DAPL), and calling for a halt to construction until such tests have been carried out as requested by the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe.

24/09/16
Author: 
Jon Queally

Leaked letter circulated within nation's largest labor federation illustrates troubling disconnect when what working people deserve and what climate science compels are actually the same thing

22/09/16
Author: 
Ben Davis
Anne Pasternak attends The 2016 Brooklyn Museum Artists Ball, Honoring Stephanie and Tim Ingrassia on April 20, 2016 in New York City. Courtesy of Nicholas Hunt/Getty Images for Brooklyn Museum.

The heads of the Field Museum, Brooklyn Museum, and Queens Museum speak out.

September 21, 2016

17/09/16
Author: 
Jill Stein
North Dakota protest- Defend the sacred banner - Getty

The fight by the Standing Rock Sioux to halt the Dakota Access Pipeline has emerged as one of the defining climate justice fights in the United States.

It has also become a central focal point of the ongoing worldwide struggle by indigenous peoples to have their treaty and land rights respected by other governments and corporations. (The fact that corporations operate as de facto government is a galling example of the need for the Green Party).

11/09/16
Author: 
Democracy Now
Amy Goodman of Democracy Now

An arrest warrant has been issued in North Dakota for Democracy Now! host and executive producer Amy Goodman. Goodman was charged with criminal trespassing, a misdemeanor offense. A team from Democracy Now! was in North Dakota last week to cover the Native American-led protests against the Dakota Access pipeline.

11/09/16
Author: 
James MacPherson
More than a thousand people gather at an encampment near North Dakota's Standing Rock Sioux reservation on Friday, Sept. 9, 2016. The Standing Rock Sioux tribe's attempt to halt construction of an oil pipeline near its North Dakota reservation failed in federal court Friday, but three government agencies asked the pipeline company to "voluntarily pause" work on a segment that tribal officials say holds sacred artifacts. (AP Photo/James MacPherson)

BISMARCK, N.D. (AP) — The Standing Rock Sioux's effort to block a four-state oil pipeline got a lifeline when the federal government temporarily stopped the project, a move some say likely may forever change the way all energy infrastructure projects are reviewed in the future.

10/09/16
Author: 
Cory Collins

Three Canadian banks are among the more than two dozen financial
institutions identified as backers of the controversial Dakota Access
Pipeline and its associated companies. The pipeline has been the focus of
intense opposition from the Standing Rock Sioux tribe in North Dakota, who
fear that a spill would poison their water supply, as well as from other
Native Americans, Indigenous peoples in Canada, and environmentalists.
 
The planned pipeline would bring oil from North Dakota to Illinois, but has

04/09/16
Author: 
Justin Gillis

Scientists’ warnings that the rise of the sea would eventually
imperil the United States’ coastline are no longer theoretical.

NORFOLK, Va. — Huge vertical rulers are sprouting beside low spots in the streets here, so people can judge if the tidal floods that increasingly inundate their roads are too deep to drive through.

Five hundred miles down the Atlantic Coast, the only road to Tybee Island, Ga., is disappearing beneath the sea several times a year, cutting the town off from the mainland.

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