Ecology/Environment

14/02/20
Author: 
Sen. Murray Sinclair
Eagle - Mizana Gheezhik (Sen. Murray Sinclair)

February 14, 2020

The rule of law is an important consideration in this dispute. Has Canada complied with its own legal requirements? That’s a question that has largely been ignored in the issuance of injunctions in disputes such as this. Canada’s obligation to resolve this jurisdictional dispute is clear from the case law, but it has failed to do so, mainly because it has declined to negotiate. Injunctions are supposed to be issued only to those “with clean hands” and Canada would likely fail on that point.

13/02/20
Author: 
Joyce Nelson
Wet’suwet’en fishing site on Bulkley River and the entrance of Moricetown Canyon, in Moricetown, British Columbia, Canada. Photograph Source: Jerome Charaoui – FAL
FEBRUARY 12, 2020
 

The uprising across Canada in support of Wet’suwet’en First Nation land defenders shows no sign of stopping. As of February 11, ports, bridges, rail lines, highways and roads have been blockaded across much of the country by solidarity protesters, who have also occupied the offices of politicians and at least one bank.

13/02/20
Author: 
Jesse Firempong

10 February, 2020

The images and stories coming out of the the RCMP raids on Wet’suwet’en are disheartening, disturbing and reflect a certain dishonesty about Canadian officials’ self-described commitment to Indigenous rights and reconciliation.

13/02/20
Author: 
Elizabeth May

February 12th 2020

On Friday, February 7, 2020, the CEO of Trans Mountain pipeline, Ian Anderson, announced that the costs of building the pipeline expansion have “soared from an initial estimate of $7.4 billion to $12.6 billion.”

That seemingly straight-forward statement is replete with misconceptions.For one thing, the pipeline’s “initial estimate” was not $7.4 billion. In the National Energy Board hearings, Kinder Morgan estimated the cost of building the pipeline expansion at $5.4 billion. So the real leap in costs is from $5.4 to $12.6 billion.

12/02/20
Author: 
Christopher Flavelle
The Syncrude Canada plant at the Athabasca oil sands near Fort McMurray, Alberta.Credit...Ben Nelms/Bloomberg

Feb. 12, 2020

Some of the world’s largest financial institutions have stopped putting their money behind oil production in the Canadian province of Alberta, home to one of the world’s most extensive, and also dirtiest, oil reserves.

12/02/20
Author: 
Stuart Parker
Stuart Parker's Blog Banner
February 11, 2020
 
Names are important. Terms are important. We need to use them more carefully and precisely than ever in this current era of spin, obfuscation, fake news and outright lies that comprise a larger and larger proportion of both our social and mainstream media.
 
12/02/20
Author: 
Andrew Leach & Martin Olszynski

Cabinet's difficult decision made more precarious as project becomes a litmus test for climate and unity

 
11/02/20
Author: 
ELIZAZAHIROVIC
Image by Michael Toledano

Feb. 11, 2020

Solidarity Statement from Professors and Scholars in Support of the Wet’suwet’en people

****UPDATE: This solidarity statement was originally sent around and signed in February 2019. But in February 2020 it started circulating again and is gaining many more new signatories in response to the RCMP raid on Wet’suwet’en territory which has happened in the past weeks. Hundreds more academics are signing daily.****

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