Global

24/01/22
Author: 
international coalition of prominent scientists and governance scholars
Sun in cloud

The following open letter was issued by an international coalition of prominent scientists and governance scholars on January 17, 2022. It calls for an international treaty to outlaw attempts to reduce global heating by blocking sunlight from reaching earth.

22/01/22
Author: 
Dana Nuccitelli

Yves here. The UN assumes that farms around the world will need to feed 2 billion more people by 2050. I suspect Mother Nature/the Jackpot will dent those numbers.

18/01/22
Author: 
Natasha Bulowski
Billionaires like Elon Musk saw their fortunes increase over the pandemic while the majority of people across the globe suffered. Photo by NASA / Wikimedia Commons

Jan. 18, 2022

The fortunes of Canada’s 59 billionaires have increased by $111 billion since March 2020, a new report finds — more than the $109 billion the Canadian government spent on income support for workers.

14/01/22
Author: 
Thom Hartmann Program and Michaela Haas
Does Arctic Drilling Violate Human Rights? (with Frode Pleym of Greenpeace Norway))

Jan 12, 2022

There is lots of gas and oil in the ground across the world. But drilling for oil disturbs more than you might think. Could drilling for oil cause so many second hand effects that the act is itself a violation of human rights?  Frode Pleym joined Thom to discuss whether Arctic drilling violate human rights. Frode Pleym is an Activist and the Senior Adviser & Leader of Greenpeace Norway.

10/01/22
Author: 
Devika Krishna Kumar
A heavy hauler truck drives through a mine above the Athabasca oil sands near Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada. Photographer: Ben Nelms/Bloomberg

Jan. 7, 2022

Canada's oil sands producers were able to export a record amount of crude to overseas markets thanks to a new link to the U.S. Gulf Coast.

08/01/22
Author: 
Seth Borenstein
This 2019 photo provided by the British Antarctic Survey shows a hole in the Thwaites glacier in Antarctica. Starting Thursday, Jan. 6, 2021, a team of scientists are sailing to the massive but melting Thwaites glacier, “the place in the world that’s the hardest to get to,” so they can better figure out how much and how fast seas will rise because of global warming eating away at Antarctica’s ice. (David Vaughan/British Antarctic Survey via AP)

Jan. 6, 2022

A team of scientists is sailing to “the place in the world that’s the hardest to get to” so they can better figure out how much and how fast seas will rise because of global warming eating away at Antarctica’s ice.

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