Indigenous Peoples

07/01/16
Author: 
CBC staff
Treaty 8 First Nations elder Jack Askoty stands on an old growth logged tree stump on the Site C construction site. (Yvonne Tupper/Facebook)

Three protesters at a construction site for the Site C dam near Fort St. John in northern B.C. have been arrested for blocking vehicles from entering the work site, RCMP said late Wednesday in a statement.

Cpl. Dave Tyreman said RCMP received a report of protesters blocking the roadway shortly after 10 a.m. PT. When officers arrived, he said, they found a man and woman blocking vehicles.

07/01/16
Author: 
Keven Drews
Helen Knott, shown in this undated handout photo, a member of the northeastern British Columbia's Prophet River First Nation, is among those protesting the construction of the $9-billion Site C hydroelectric project. A protest camp has been set up at Rocky Mountain Fort, the former site of a North West Company fur-trading post established in 1794 on the west side of the Moberly River, near Fort St. John. Protesters say they are willing to be arrested. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Helen Knott

VANCOUVER – First Nations protesting the construction of the $9-billion Site C dam in northeastern British Columbia are preparing for their own arrests while they implore Prime Minister Justin Trudeau intervene to stop the hydroelectric project.

Helen Knott of the Prophet River First Nation said in an interview from the protest site that she and six other demonstrators are camped at Rocky Mountain Fort, the former site of a North West Company fur-trading post established in 1794 on the west side of the Moberly River, near Fort St. John.

05/01/16
Author: 
Kristy Kirkup
Ontario Regional Chief Isadore Day says First Nations have become reliant on winter roads, which are suffering due to warm weather patterns associated with climate change. (Canadian Press/Aaron Vincent Elkaim)

Wonky weather conditions are prompting aboriginal leaders to raise concerns about the impact of climate change on winter roads, which serve as lifelines for food, fuel and other necessities in several northern communities.

Isadore Day, the Ontario regional chief for the Assembly of First Nations, said the reliability of the northern winter road network is in jeopardy in his province.

05/01/16
Author: 
Jonny Wakefield
A charter helicopter lifted a survival trailer with a wood stove and bunk house, shown here, to the site in late December. The next day, Hydro posted notice that the area would be cleared for logging. Photo Courtesy of Helen Knott

Site C opponents dug in on the south bank of the Peace River say they're not going anywhere, despite an eviction notice from BC Hydro. 

A dozen people opposed to the $8.8-billion dam have been living in shifts at the historic Rocky Mountain Fort since mid-December. The camp is set up on the site of an 18th century fur trade fort, upstream from the confluence of the Peace and Moberly Rivers.  

05/01/16
Author: 
Jonny Wakefield
A charter helicopter lifted a survival trailer with a wood stove and bunk house, shown here, to the site in late December. The next day, Hydro posted notice that the area would be cleared for logging. Photo Courtesy of Helen Knott

Site C opponents dug in on the south bank of the Peace River say they're not going anywhere, despite an eviction notice from BC Hydro. 

A dozen people opposed to the $8.8-billion dam have been living in shifts at the historic Rocky Mountain Fort since mid-December. The camp is set up on the site of an 18th century fur trade fort, upstream from the confluence of the Peace and Moberly Rivers.  

03/01/16
Author: 
mediocritysucks05@hotmail.com
Honour treaty rights sign - Peace River

“You remember that story that the elder told us? Down the way where the Pe1014188_10151512297076627_1280210942_nace River meets the Halfway River?” I asked her, referring to the camp we had over three years ago.

03/01/16
Author: 
Gordon Hoekstra
Oil tanker traffic in Burrard Inlet would increase significantly to service an expanded Trans Mountain Pipeline.

METRO VANCOUVER -- As the federal review of Kinder Morgan’s $6.8-billion Trans Mountain Pipeline expansion nears its end, at least a dozen First Nations continue to say the review is flawed, and they oppose the project over its potential environmental effects.

Those effects, they say, include the risk of tanker spills in Burrard Inlet.

Barring intervention in the review process by the new federal government under Justin Trudeau, these First Nations are prepared to take their fight to the courts.

27/12/15
Author: 
Martin Lukacs
 Indigenous activists lead the Red Lines action in Paris at the end of the UN climate negotiations on December 12, 2015. Photograph: Allan Lissner

The terrifying deadlines approached by climate change tempt us to despair. But the face of the movement stirs us to courage.

Two certainties existed entering the Paris climate talks. They hold as true coming out. The first was that the world’s heads of state were not prepared to act as is necessary. The second is that it was never going to be up to them anyway.

24/12/15
Author: 
New Internationalist Editorial
 People's climate march Dec 2015 © Dominique Z Barron

An open letter from the Wretched of the Earth bloc to the organizers of the People’s Climate March of Justice and Jobs.  

17/12/15
Author: 
Assembly of First Nations of Quebec and Labrador (AFNQL) Regional Chief Ghislain Picard Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs (AMC) Grand Chief Derek Nepinak, llb, ba (Hons) Union of British Columbia Indian Chiefs (UBCIC

December 17, 2015

OPEN LETTER TO THE RIGHT HONOURABLE PRIME MINISTER TRUDEAU

Re:      Fixing the Broken Review Process for Tar Sands Pipelines

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