Oil - Pipelines

09/07/22
Author: 
Geoff Dembicki
Imperial Oil’s refinery in Nanticoke, Ontario. The Exxon subsidiary first examined carbon sequestration in the 1980s.

July 7, 2022

The touted tech is still scarce and pricey, and even oilsands allies counsel caution.

In late June, Alberta Premier Jason Kenney flew to Washington, D.C., with the heads of major oilsands producers to make the case that Canada’s most carbon polluting industry cares deeply about fixing climate change.

24/06/22
Author: 
Natasha Bulowski
Construction of the Trans Mountain pipeline is seen underway in Kamloops, B.C., Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2020. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward

Jun 24, 2022

Secret reports the federal government is relying on to argue the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion is commercially viable are based on the unrealistic assumption the pipeline will operate for 100 years, Canada’s financial watchdog told Canada’s National Observer.

22/06/22
Author: 
Victoria Kim, Clifford Krauss and Anton Troianovski
A Lukoil refinery in Volgograd, Russia.Credit...Reuters
Jun 21, 2022
 

With China and India buying the Russian oil shunned by the West in an effort to force an end to the Ukraine invasion, Moscow is earning more now than it did before the war.

SEOUL — When the United States and European Union moved to curtail purchases of Russian fossil fuels this year, they hoped it would help make the Russian invasion of Ukraine so economically painful for Moscow that President Vladimir V. Putin would be forced to abandon it.

That prospect now seems remote at best.

22/06/22
Author: 
Paul Henderson
Work in a small forested area on the Trans Mountain Pipeline Expansion Project near Chilliwack was halted in early June 2022 after activists found a red-breasated sapsucker nest and notified the company. (Community Nest Finding Network photo)

Jun 21, 2022

‘This sapsucker mama stopped them with our help’ – Sara Ross with the Community Nest Finding Network

Construction on the Trans Mountain Pipeline Expansion Project (TMX) has finally started in the Chilliwack area, but thanks to a couple of mating woodpeckers, it’s on hold at one location near Bridal Falls.

22/06/22
Author: 
David Thurton
A yard servicing government-owned oil pipeline operator Trans Mountain is seen in Kamloops, B.C., on June 7, 2021. The Parliamentary Budget Officer said Wednesday the project's expansion is no longer profitable. (Jennifer Gauthier/Reuters)

Jun 22, 2022

Parliamentary Budget Officer issues new report after pipeline's construction costs soar

Canada's budget watchdog says building the federally owned Trans Mountain pipeline expansion is no longer a profitable investment after costs ballooned to more than $21 billion.

21/06/22
Author: 
Andrew Nikiforuk
Rushallgardenaerial.png

June 10, 2022

originally published by The Tyee

Part 2 [Read Part 1 here]

People just want to go on doing what they’re doing. They want business as usual. They say, “Oh yes, there’s going to be a problem up ahead,” but they don’t want to change anything. — James Lovelock

21/06/22
Author: 
Andrew Nikiforuk
Oil traders in Houston. By Own Oil Industry News – Own Own work, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=8266714

June 9, 2022

originally published by The Tyee

Part 1

If you are sitting around the kitchen table contemplating the escalating cost of your grocery bills (and just about everything else), then welcome to what U.S. writer James Kunstler calls “the long emergency.”

20/06/22
Author: 
Courtney Dickson
An oil refinery is seen in this June 2019 file photo. A new campaign is calling on people and governments in B.C. to back a plan to take oil companies to court for their role in climate change. (Andrew Vaughan/Canadian Press)

Jun 15, 2022

West Coast Environmental Law plans to take on fossil fuel companies for their role in climate change

Our planet is changing. So is our journalism. This story is part of Our Changing Planet, a CBC News initiative to show and explain the effects of climate change and what is being done about it. Keep up with the latest news on our Climate and Environment page.

16/06/22
Author: 
Natasha Bulowski
Trans Mountain says a "slight increase" to its current oil spill liabilities plan will be enough to cover the expansion project, but this falls far short of what the regulator requires, says independent economist Robyn Allan. Photo by Jesse Winter

Jun 15, 2022

When Trans Mountain's new pipeline and facilities are ready to operate, the company says "a slight increase" to its $1-billion liabilities plan for the existing pipeline will be sufficient to cover the risk of an oil spill on either the current line or its new counterpart.

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