British Columbia

10/04/22
Author: 
John Innes and Michael Paul Nelson
An aerial view of old-growth clear-cut logging in the Caycuse watershed on Vancouver Island taken earlier this summer. Photo: TJ Watt.

[Editor: This is an older article but still very relevant.]

July 16, 2021

08/04/22
Author: 
John Woodside
Wet’suwet’en nation hereditary Chief Namoks (right) walks with Chief Gisdaya (centre) and Chief Madeek while in Toronto for the Royal Bank of Canada annual general meeting, on Thursday, April 7, 2022. (Christopher Katsarov / Canada's National Observer)

Apr. 8, 2022

On the second floor of a hotel in the shadow of the CN Tower, Wet’suwet’en hereditary leadership and their allies crowded around laptops and cellphones for one purpose: confront RBC executives over the bank’s financing of the Coastal GasLink pipeline.

07/04/22
Author: 
Ben Parfitt
Logs piled up awaiting conversion to wood pellets at a factory now owned by multinational Drax Group. Photo from Stand.earth.

Mar. 7, 2022

Diane Nicholls takes a senior role in a controversial industry she helped regulate. And promote.

At mid-afternoon on Monday, senior staff at B.C.’s Forests Ministry were told that one of their highest-ranking members — the province’s chief forester, Diane Nicholls — was entering a revolving door that would sweep her seamlessly out of government and into the industry her ministry regulates.

05/04/22
Author: 
Stefan Labbé
The Millenium Line SkyTrain passes through Port Moody.Steve Ray for the Tri-City News

Apr. 4, 2022

Rich households were found to benefit the most from Millennium Line and Canada Line SkyTrain extensions, so who should pay for them going forward?

Expanding rapid transit systems has long been accepted as a necessary precursor to improving the lives of working class households while reducing emissions from gas-powered cars. 

But could Vancouver’s growing SkyTrain network be helping the rich the most? 

05/04/22
Author: 
Kenneth Chan
SkyTrain Expo Line (Shutterstock)

Apr. 4, 2022

To avoid major cuts in service levels, the federal and provincial governments jointly announced today they will be providing TransLink with an additional $176 million in pandemic-time operating subsidy funding.

An additional $28 million will also be provided to BC Transit.

05/04/22
Author: 
Tiffany Crawford

Mar. 31, 2022

Sierra Club B.C., represented by environmental law charity Ecojustice, alleges the provincial government has not provided plans to achieve emissions targets past 2030.

A B.C. environmental group is suing the B.C. government alleging it has failed to provide a detailed plan to meet its own climate change targets.

02/04/22
Author: 
Cloe Logan
British Columbia Premier John Horgan makes his way towards the 2019 Meeting of Canada’s Premiers event in Toronto on Dec. 2, 2019. Photo by Tijana Martin/ National Observer

Mar. 28, 2022

A B.C. program that has been referred to as a “tax loophole for fracking operators” cost the province $1.162 billion in royalty revenues last year.

30/03/22
Author: 
Charlie Carey
Aerial spraying of herbicides, like this helicopter seen in the Prince George Forest District, are part of a proposed South Coast Pest Management Plan from BC Timber Sales.James Steidle

Mar. 24, 2022

The five year Pest Management Plan, which covers Squamish to Hope, targets native hard woods and Indigenous medicines and food in efforts to increase lumber output.

A proposed BC Timber Sales Pest Management Plan is gaining attention and fierce push back, as the provincial agency seeks to use aerial and ground spraying of herbicides to increase commercial lumber output.

26/03/22
Author: 
Judith Lavoie
Nuchatlaht Ha’wilth (Hereditary Chief) Jordan Michael says logging has destroyed old-growth forest and salmon streams on Nootka Island, but the province won’t recognize Nuchatlaht First Nation’s right to manage the territory. Photo via Nuchatlaht First Nation.

Mar. 22, 2022

The nation is in BC Supreme Court to claim title to heavily-logged land the province says they ‘abandoned.’

As Archie Little anticipated the groundbreaking Indigenous title case that began in B.C. Supreme Court yesterday, March 21, he emphasized the phrase supporters are using to describe the legal battle between the tiny Nuchatlaht First Nation and the provincial and federal governments.

25/03/22
Author: 
Susan Lazaruk
Transit advocate Nathan Davidowicz at Oakridge Skytrain Station in Vancouver. PHOTO BY ARLEN REDEKOP /PNG

Mar. 24, 2022

A transit user advocate says raising fares discourages passengers from returning to the transit system, which is down 50 per cent of pre-pandemic ridership numbers

Beginning July 1, it is going to cost more to ride transit in Metro Vancouver.

 

With little discussion at a TransLink board meeting on Thursday, the transit authority approved an average 2.3-per-cent fare hike, bucking a nationwide trend to combat low ridership by freezing fees after two years of the pandemic.

 

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