Ecology/Environment

09/05/22
Author: 
John Woodside
Wet’suwet’en nation hereditary Chief Namoks walks with Chief Gisdaya, Chief Madeek, and Wing Chief Sleydo' while in Toronto for the Royal Bank of Canada annual general meeting on April 7, 2022. Photo by Christopher Katsarov / Canada's National Observer

May 9, 2022

Canada is ignoring the condemnations of a United Nations human rights committee urging a halt to construction of the Trans Mountain and Coastal GasLink pipelines.

09/05/22
Author: 
Brandi Morin
Wet’suwet’en report round-the-clock surveillance and harassment by RCMP and pipeline security

May 2, 2022

Drilling under the Wedzin Kwa river is expected to begin any day

t’s mid-afternoon and 67-year-old Wet’suwet’en Elder Janet Williams startles awake from a nap, rushing to put on her jacket and shoes. She’s been abruptly woken by unwanted visitors to her remote cabin home. But this isn’t the first time the RCMP has marched onto the traditional territories of her Gidimt’en Clan. It’s been happening multiple times a day for over two months, she says.

06/05/22
Author: 
By Timothée Parrique, originally published by Timothée Parrique blog

It took me a while but I finally digested the 107 pages of Chapter 5: Demand, services and social aspects of mitigation in the last IPCC report on Mitigation of climate change. This chapter is worth the read if only because it’s the first one fully dedicated to demand-side strategies.

03/05/22
Author: 
Betsy Trumpener
A gas plant near Rolla, B.C. The province's energy regulator says there are more than 8,000 active gas wells and 39,000 kilometres of pipelines in B.C. (Contributed/Wayne Sawchuk)

Apr. 27, 2022

Some residents in northern B.C. say they're paying the price for huge LNG project and its touted benefits

When Kevin McCleary and his wife cleared 160 acres of land to build their home in Pouce Coupe, B.C., two decades ago, they didn't expect a hydraulic fracturing gas well pad would be built less than half a kilometre from their front door.

23/04/22
Author: 
René Bruemmer
People mark Earth Day with a march, Friday, April 22, 2022 in Montreal. PHOTO BY RYAN REMIORZ /The Canadian Press

Apr 22, 2022 

Hundreds marched through the downtown core calling for an end to fossil fuels by 2030 and higher taxes on the rich to fund climate change programs.

Chanting “We want climate justice — now!”, hundreds of demonstrators took to the streets of Old Montreal and the downtown core Friday afternoon to mark Earth Day.

10/04/22
Author: 
John Innes and Michael Paul Nelson
An aerial view of old-growth clear-cut logging in the Caycuse watershed on Vancouver Island taken earlier this summer. Photo: TJ Watt.

[Editor: This is an older article but still very relevant.]

July 16, 2021

08/04/22
Author: 
John Woodside
Wet’suwet’en nation hereditary Chief Namoks (right) walks with Chief Gisdaya (centre) and Chief Madeek while in Toronto for the Royal Bank of Canada annual general meeting, on Thursday, April 7, 2022. (Christopher Katsarov / Canada's National Observer)

Apr. 8, 2022

On the second floor of a hotel in the shadow of the CN Tower, Wet’suwet’en hereditary leadership and their allies crowded around laptops and cellphones for one purpose: confront RBC executives over the bank’s financing of the Coastal GasLink pipeline.

08/04/22
Author: 
Olivia Rosane, EcoWatch
The latest IPCC report finds we are not on track to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius. Alain Pitton / NurPhoto / Getty Images.

Apr. 5, 2022

‘A File Of Shame’.

Policies in place to reduce emissions as of December 2020 would lead the planet to 3.2 degrees Celsius of warming, more than double the 1.5 degrees limit that scientists say is essential for avoiding the worst impacts of the climate crisis.

07/04/22
Author: 
Ben Parfitt
Logs piled up awaiting conversion to wood pellets at a factory now owned by multinational Drax Group. Photo from Stand.earth.

Mar. 7, 2022

Diane Nicholls takes a senior role in a controversial industry she helped regulate. And promote.

At mid-afternoon on Monday, senior staff at B.C.’s Forests Ministry were told that one of their highest-ranking members — the province’s chief forester, Diane Nicholls — was entering a revolving door that would sweep her seamlessly out of government and into the industry her ministry regulates.

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