Tar Sands

11/11/22
Author: 
Nia Williams
An oil worker holds raw oilsands near Fort McMurray, Alta., July 9, 2008. The difference between the price of Western Canada Select (WCS) — an oilsands bitumen blend — and New York-traded West Texas Intermediate (WTI) has widened dramatically in October, to more than US$25 per barrel, according to a Scotiabank report. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh

Dec. 10, 2022

Canada’s benchmark heavy crude, Western Canada Select (WCS), is trading at a steep discount to West Texas Intermediate (WTI) after weakening sharply last month, and is expected to remain subdued well into next year.

Why is WCS under pressure?

WCS for delivery at the Hardisty, Alberta, hub is trading close to $30 a barrel under WTI, having averaged $16.67 a barrel below WTI for the first three quarters of 2022.

A number of factors are to blame.

04/09/22
Author: 
Gooderham Nathan

[Web page editor: Read this exposure of the Canadian government's duplicity on emissions.]

Aug 23 2022 - 

30/08/22
Author: 
Compiled by Mitchell Beer
jasonwoodhead23/flickr

Aug. 7, 2022

Canada’s biggest fossil companies are lining up to dismiss the federal government’s new emissions cap for their sector as “very aggressive” and “almost unrealistic”, even as Environment Minister Steven Guilbeault hastens to offer them flexibility and an extended deadline to hit the long-awaited target.

09/07/22
Author: 
Geoff Dembicki
Imperial Oil’s refinery in Nanticoke, Ontario. The Exxon subsidiary first examined carbon sequestration in the 1980s.

July 7, 2022

The touted tech is still scarce and pricey, and even oilsands allies counsel caution.

In late June, Alberta Premier Jason Kenney flew to Washington, D.C., with the heads of major oilsands producers to make the case that Canada’s most carbon polluting industry cares deeply about fixing climate change.

09/06/22
Author: 
John Woodside
Tailings ponds in northern Alberta. File photo by Andrew S. Wright

June 3, 2022

Canadians stand to lose over $100 billion in the energy transition as investors around the world continue to pour money into fossil fuel assets that will eventually become worthless, a bombshell international study finds.

12/05/22
Author: 
Darren Shore
When fossil fuel corporations don’t pay their taxes, our future generations will also pick up the tab — and at this rate, that bill will be gargantuan. Photo by Eelco Böhtlingk/Unsplash

May 12, 2022

Almost all debate about taxes and climate change has focused on carbon pricing, eclipsing an uncomfortable truth: Canada’s tax system is undermining our ability to move quickly on the transition to clean energy.

03/05/22
Author: 
Amanda Stephenson The Canadian Press
Cenovus CEO Alex Pourbaix in Calgary, Alta., Thursday, Jan. 30, 2020. The Canadian Press/Jeff McIntosh

Apr. 27, 2022

The investment tax credit unveiled by the federal government earlier this month isn't enough to convince Canada's major oilsands producers to begin construction on a proposed massive carbon capture and storage transportation line, the chief executive of Cenovus Energy Inc. said Wednesday.

26/04/22
Author: 
Emma Graney Energy Reporter

Apr. 26, 2022

Cutting emissions from Canada’s oil sands by 40 per cent will cost between $45-billion and $65-billion from 2024 through 2030, according to a new analysis.

While the new report from Royal Bank of Canada found that Canada’s oil and gas sector can indeed balance near-term energy security with advancing climate action, the sector will need regulatory certainty and support at all levels of government to do so.

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